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The latest issue of Survey Notes is here!

Our latest issue of Survey Notes is here! Find articles on mapping Utah wetlands & UGS’s role in contributing water-quality data to the National Ground-Water Monitoring Network, and more among our regular featured columns.

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Check out past issues of Survey Notes

POTD October 25, 2016: Yant Flat, Washington County

Yant Flat, Washington County

Photographer: Gregg Beukelman © 2016

Above the Virgin River valley, evening sun strikes outcrops of the Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone. Weathering patterns and alternating bands of chemically oxidized (red) and reduced (white) mineral cements combine to produce interesting patterns of texture and color.

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POTD October 19, 2016: White Rock Bay, Antelope Island State Park, Davis County

White Rock Bay, Antelope Island State Park, Davis County
Photographer: Ken Krahulec © 2016

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Earth Science Week 2016

Earth Science Week is in full swing at the Utah Geological Survey this week.

Our stream trailer allows students to create and destroy a river landscape while learning about deposition and erosion.

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Geologic map of Dugway Proving Ground and adjacent areas, Tooele County, Utah

Geologic map of Dugway Proving Ground and adjacent areas, Tooele County, Utah.
By: Donald L. Clark, Charles G. Oviatt, and David Page

GET IT HERE

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Dugway Proving Ground is an expansive military installation that covers parts of the southern Great Salt Lake Desert and Government Creek Basin, and the southern Cedar Mountains, Wildcat Mountain, Granite Peak, and northern Dugway Range. The ranges contain Paleozoic marine sedimentary rocks about 28,000 feet (8540 m) thick, excepting Granite Peak- a Late Jurassic granitic intrusion. The southern Cedar Mountains volcanic field contains Eocene intermediate to silicic rocks, while the rhyolitic Sapphire Mountain lava flow is Miocene. Paleozoic rock packages are distributed among at least three thrusts sheets of the Sevier fold-thrust belt (Cretaceous to Eocene). Regional extension since about 20 million years ago has broken the area into basins and ranges along high-angle normal faults. Quaternary surficial deposits originated from the Bonneville lake cycle, and alluvial, eolian, and mixed environments. A unique feature is the Old River Bed and associated delta complex at its northern terminus, related to surface- water overflow and goundwater discharge from the Sevier basin to the Great Salt Lake basin between about 15,000 and 10,000 years ago. The delta was occupied by prehistoric humans.

Living Rock from the Great Salt Lake, Now in our Permanent Exhibits

nhmu.utah.edu

In June of 2016, we added a new, living exhibit in the Great Salt Lake Gallery on the third floor of the museum. At first glance, the three stone-looking bumps in a tank aren’t as impressive as the Cretaceous monsters looming in the background. But their humble appearance masks what might be the most awesome creature on display: these lumpy guys are one of the oldest forms of life on Earth.

The Science Behind Yellowstone’s Rainbow Hot Spring

smithsonianmag.com

It’s not hard to find natural wonders within Yellowstone National Park, but the park’s largest hot spring might be the most remarkable, and not just for its size: dubbed the Grand Prismatic Spring, the hot spring radiates extremely hot water—and stunning prismatic color—from its center.

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Bryce Canyon National Park to hold the 10th Annual Geology Festival in July

kcsg.com

BRYCE, Utah – Bryce Canyon National Park will hold the 10th Annual Geology Festival July 15-16, 2016. This year’s theme is “Exploring the Eocene Epoch: Dawn of Modern Mammals”, which is the time when the rocks of Bryce Canyon were forming. Join guest speaker, Dr. L. Greer Price of the New Mexico Geological Survey as he presents “Earth Sciences for the 21st Century: Where we’ve been and where we’re going”.

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Sunset on Gooseberry Mesa shines golden light on cliffs of Triassic-age Shinarump Conglomerate and the underlying slope-forming Moenkopi Formation. White cliffs and peaks in the distance are thrones and temples of Zion National Park, formed of Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone. Gooseberry Mesa, Washington County, Utah Photographer: J. Lucy Jordan; © 2016

POTD June 10, 2016: Gooseberry Mesa, Washington County, Utah

POTD 5-31-16 Washington County

Gooseberry Mesa, Washington County, Utah
Photographer: J. Lucy Jordan; © 2016

Sunset on Gooseberry Mesa shines golden light on cliffs of Triassic-age Shinarump Conglomerate and the underlying slope-forming Moenkopi Formation. White cliffs and peaks in the distance are thrones and temples of Zion National Park, formed of Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone.

Lake Powell’s Gunsight Bay as seen from Alstrom Point, Kane County. Alstrom Point, Kane County, Utah Photographer: Marshall Robinson; © 2016

POTD June 3, 2016: Alstrom Point, Kane County, Utah

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Alstrom Point, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Marshall Robinson; © 2016

Lake Powell’s Gunsight Bay as seen from Alstrom Point, Kane County.