2018 Lake Bonneville Geologic Conference and Short Course

October 3–6, 2018

Utah Department of Natural Resources Auditorium

1594 West North Temple

Salt Lake City, Utah

Please contact Adam McKean with questions (801-537-3386 or adammckean@utah.gov).

With the publication in 2016 of the “Lake Bonneville: A Scientific Update” book, the Utah Geological Survey is interested in bringing together the geologic community to review and discuss relevant research in the Lake Bonneville basin. The goal of the conference and short course is twofold: (1) to provide a setting for the review and discussion of Lake Bonneville/Great Salt Lake geologic research, and (2) provide education and networking opportunities for the local geologic community.

A registration fee of $26 per day will be charged for all participants (lunch, and morning and afternoon snacks will be provided). The short course will be limited to the first 50 participants. REGISTER HERE

For additional information. PRINT FLIER

Save the date!

Lake Bonneville Geologic Conference October 3-4, 2018

Lake Bonneville Geologic Short Course October 5-6, 2018

The conference and short course will be held at the Utah Department of Natural Resources Auditorium at 1594 West North Temple in Salt Lake City, Utah. The conference will be open to the geologic community. The conference will cover geologic topic related to pre-Bonneville Quaternary lakes, Lake Bonneville, the Gilbert episode, and Great Salt Lake. The short course will be led by Jack Oviatt and will review Lake Bonneville geology. The first day of the short course will consist of classroom instruction and the second day will consist of a field trip to nearby sites where Bonneville stratigraphy and landforms will be observed. These meetings are sponsored by the Utah Geological Survey and the Utah Division of Professional and Occupational Licensing.

The conference format will include technical presentations, a poster session, and group discussions.

If you are interested in presenting at the conference, please contact Adam McKean for further information. Registration for the meeting will hopefully open by the end of July. A separate formal announcement will be sent out with an online registration link on that day.

A registration fee of $26 per day will be charged all participants (lunch, morning and afternoon snacks, and short course booklet will be provided).

Please contact Adam McKean with questions (801-537-3386 or adammckean@utah.gov).

Partial funding for this educational opportunity has been provided by the Utah Division of Occupational & Professional Licensing and the Education and Enforcement Fund.

Petrified Dunes offer short hike with great views, opportunities for exploring

ksl.com

SNOW CANYON STATE PARK — If you’re looking to get off the trail and explore the treasures of Snow Canyon State Park, the Petrified Dunes hike is the place to go.

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Our Geological Wonderland: A trip through the Virgin River Gorge

suindependent.com

According to the Arizona Department of Transportation, approximately 23,000 vehicles travel through the impressive scenery of the Virgin River Gorge on Interstate 15 daily. Located in the northwestern corner of Arizona, the Virgin River Gorge can be considered with a modest dose of imagination to be a geological example of the rabbit hole in “Alice in Wonderland.” With even a passing interest, it becomes evident that there are major changes in the geography and geology from one end to the other. These changes are due to the fact that hiding in plain sight within the gorge is a major geologic province boundary. This boundary separates the Colorado Plateau Province on the east from the Basin and Range Province on the west (Figure 1). Significant differences geographic and geologic features are a result of differences in the geologic history and the geologic processes that are operating below the surface of these two provinces. Exposed rocks visible in the gorge, however, provide “forensic” evidence for what is happening.

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‘This has been a really well-kept secret:’ Take a tour of Utah’s forgotten petroglyphs

ksl.com

COALVILLE — NaVee Vernon seemed unconcerned about the snowflakes swirling around her as she eagerly led a group of about a dozen state, county and local officials up a hill toward Coalville Ledge.

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New aerial video shows Riverdale landslide’s alarming progress

standard.net

RIVERDALE — A new aerial video helps show the extent of the Spring Creek Road Landslide, which has prompted evacuations and continues to grow as spring runoff increases.

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Rock art activists are sitting on shooting sites to protect petroglyphs

heraldextra.com

Steve Acerson stopped his car and waited for the shooting to stop.

It was coming from the left, where a group of three men were shooting across the dirt road at a target pinned to a fence, just several yards away from a sign that warned about cultural artifacts in the area. Up the mountainside were several petroglyphs, ancient etchings into rocks made thousands of years ago.

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2017 UGS Employee of the Year

Congratulations to John Good who was named the 2017 UGS Employee of the Year. John is a Graphic Arts Specialist with the Editorial Section and has worked for the Department of Natural Resources for 15 years, including the last three years with the UGS. His creative talent and commitment to produce high-quality publications has contributed to a positive UGS image to both the public and other government agencies. John has developed an excellent working relationship with authors and editors, understands their requests, and is always willing to research and find solutions to new and challenging publishing issues. His excellent work, productivity, positive attitude, and friendly sense of humor make John an outstanding employee and a deserving recipient of this special award and recognition.

Southern Utah mine being chipped away by visitors; hurting small town business owner

kutv.com

To many in southern Utah it’s known as the “Glitter Mine” but to one Veyo business owner, Russ Feller, it’s more than that, it’s his livelihood.

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PRESS RELEASE: The Utah Geological Survey 2018 Calendar of Utah Geology

Media Contact
Vicky Clarke
801-537-3330
vickyclarke@utah.gov

2018 Calendar of Utah Geology is the Best Yet!

The Utah Geological Survey (UGS) recently released the 12th edition of its popular Calendar of Utah Geology. The 2018 calendar features inspiring photographs by UGS staff of Utah’s geologic wonders with a brief explanation of how and when they formed.

Weathering and erosion of the Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone forms a fantastic array of stone structures locally referred to as “goblins.” Goblin Valley State Park, Emery County. Photographed by Gregg Beukelman.

Eight years ago Gregg Beukelman, whose photograph was selected for the calendar’s cover, moved to Utah from Idaho when he landed his current job as a geologist with UGS’s Geologic Hazards Program. After the move Beukelman found himself with free time in what he describes as “hands down the most beautiful state in the nation.”

Beukelman previously had a passing interest in photography, but it was Utah’s incredible landscapes and vistas that stoked his passion. He now spends many of his off-work hours traveling across Utah searching out vistas and awaiting lighting conditions that allow him to create his stunning images.  Like other employees whose photographs have been featured in the calendar, Beukelman’s have transformed from nice landscape shots to true works of art.

Beukelman is not alone in his path from geology to photography. The calendar has featured more than 40 UGS geologists. Other staff members have taken an opposite tack and were previously artists who sought employment with UGS because of their love of the outdoors and curiosity about geology. UGS graphic designer John Good and Natural Resources Map & Bookstore clerk Andy Cvar are both featured in this year’s calendar.

Both the artists who have turned to geology and the geologists who have turned to art have contributed to a tradition of growing excellence to create what proves to be the best Calendar of Utah Geology to date!

The 2018 Calendar of Utah Geology is the same price as last year, $4.95 each or $4.25 for orders of 10 or more, and is available at the Natural Resources Map & Bookstore, 1594 West North Temple, Salt Lake City, (801) 537-3320 or 1-888-UTAHMAP. They may also be purchased online.

The Utah Geological Survey provides timely scientific information about Utah’s geologic environment, resources, and hazards. It is one of seven divisions within the Utah Department of Natural Resources.

The hoodoos of Devils Garden, Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Garfield County. Photographed by John Good.

Morning glow and moonset over the Cretaceous-age Mancos Formation of Factory Butte, Wayne County. Photographed by Gregg Beukelman.

Reduced and oxidized mudstone of the Triassic-age Chinle Formation in the San Rafael Swell, Emery County. Photographed by Natural Resources Map and Bookstore clerk Andy Cvar.