UGS Rockfall Investigation in the News

Here are several more articles about the UGS rockfall investigation, including our own news release with links to the published report.

UGS News Release
Deseret News article
ABC News article

News on the Latest UGS Rockfall Investigation in the Zion Area

kcsg.com

Residents living within high rock-fall-hazard zones in Rockville, Utah, face the possible consequences of a large rock fall similar to the fatal event that occurred last December. That is the principle finding of a geologic investigation into the rock fall that killed two people on December 12, 2013. That afternoon, a huge, joint-controlled rock mass, with an estimated volume of almost 1,400 cubic yards and weighing about 2,700 tons, detached from the cliff face at the top of the Rockville Bench, near Zion National Park. The rock mass fell onto the steep slope below the cliff, and shattered into numerous fragments. The rock fall debris then moved rapidly downslope before striking and destroying a house, detached garage, and a car. The largest boulder to strike the house weighed an estimated 520 tons.

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USGS Release: New Utah Maps and Road Provider

usgs.gov

Newly released US Topo maps  for Utah now feature a new commercial road data provider. The latest highway, road and street data from HERE has been added to the 1,476 revised US Topo quadrangles for the state.

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New Feature – “Spot the Rock” Kicks off Today

Hey geo friends! Today we kick off an exciting new feature—”Spot the Rock”. Check out this press release for more info, and stay tuned for the inaugural post of “Spot the Rock” later today!
Like us on FACEBOOK or follow us on TWITTER to participate!

kcsg.com
The Utah Geological Survey (UGS) kicks off a new way to familiarize yourself with the state. It is called “Spot the Rock” and it is a way to show off Utah’s spectacular geologically themed sights.
READ MORE HERE

Geology | Jurassic sea of sand stretched for miles and miles

www.dispatch.com

Sand. Sand as far as the eye could see. Sand that stretched from central Arizona to northern Wyoming and spilled into California and Nevada. Dunes as tall as 30 feet.

READ MORE HERE

"Behind the Scenes" look at Natural History Museum yields earth's secrets

deseretnews.com

At any given moment in the foothills of Salt Lake City, DNA sequencing of a tiny kernel of corn could unlock new information about ancient agriculture in Utah.

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Grand Staircase book details monument's paleontological wonders

deseretnews.com

A 656-page book chronicling the paleontological discoveries and success evidenced so far at Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument has been published, even as new discoveries continue to unfold on a near daily basis.
“I am here to emphasize that we are just getting started at the Grand Staircase,” said Alan Titus, the monument’s paleontologist. “We have a great big sandbox to play in.”

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Green River’s John Wesley Powell Museum traces history of Utah rivers

sltrib.com

To those who have taken the time to explore Utah’s rivers, standing on the patio of the John Wesley Powell River History Museum and staring at the muddy waters of the Green River below brings back many feelings and emotions. Desolation Canyon, the Gates of Lodore, Split Mountain, Echo Park and the undammed Yampa lie upstream, filled with rapids, incredible scenery and compelling history.

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US seismic array eyes its final frontier

nature.com

On Maine’s rugged coast, just north of the tourist town of Boothbay, an underground seismometer is listening for earthquakes. Engineers activated it on 26 September, completing the US$90-million Transportable Array, an ambitious effort to blanket the contiguous United States with a moveable grid of seismic monitors (see ‘On the march’).

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New 'King of Gore' dinosaur unveiled at Natural History Museum

deseretnews.com

Weighing in at more than 2 tons and two dozen feet long, a new species of dinosaur related to Tyrannosaurus rex was fierce enough to be dubbed “King of Gore.” The discovery of “Lythronax argestes” at the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah was announced Wednesday at the Natural History Museum of Utah and coincides with the publication of a study in PLoS ONE, an open access scientific journal.

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