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Pinnacles eroded from Tertiary-age lava flow breccia along State Route 20, Garfield County.

POTD April 12, 2016: State Route 20, Garfield County, Utah

POTD 4-12-16 lava flow Garfield County

State Route 20, Garfield County, Utah
Photographer: Bob Biek; © 2015

Pinnacles eroded from Tertiary-age lava flow breccia along State Route 20, Garfield County.

 

Little Deer Creek cascades over sandstone ledges of the Precambrian-age Hades Pass unit of the Uinta Mountain Group into Cataract Gorge on the Duchesne River, Duchesne County. Duchesne River, Duchesne County, Utah Photographer: Rich Emerson; © 2015

POTD April 6, 2016: Duchesne River, Duchesne County, Utah

POTD 4-5-16 Duchesne County Waterfall

Duchesne River, Duchesne County, Utah
Photographer: Rich Emerson; © 2015

Little Deer Creek cascades over sandstone ledges of the Precambrian-age Hades Pass unit of the Uinta Mountain Group into Cataract Gorge on the Duchesne River, Duchesne County.

Campaign Urges Utahns to ‘Be Ready’ for disasters

ksl.com

Disasters can happen anytime and anywhere. That’s why state officials are urging Utahns to “Be Ready.”

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Human-caused quakes a big problem, but not in Utah yet

fox13now.com

While geologists warn that human-caused earthquakes have become a real problem in some places, the greatest risk in Utah is still a natural quake along the Wasatch Front.

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Amazing Places to See Hoodoos

weather.com

They’re formed over thousands of years and transform deserts into fantastical alien landscapes. Hoodoos, also called fairy chimneys, earth pyramids and tent rocks, are tall skinny spires of rock that protrude from the bottom of arid basins and “broken” lands. They range from five-feet tall to the height of a 10-story building, and typically form from two weathering processes that continuously work together in eroding the edges of a rock formation. Here, we take a look at destinations around the world that feature these towering wonders.

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Energy Success Stories: Discovering Utah’s Geothermal Potential

The Utah FORGE team collaborated with the Utah Governor’s Office of Energy Development to produce this video short highlighting Utah’s vast geothermal potential.

Check out the Utah FORGE Facebook to follow updates on the projects!

Glacially scoured and polished quartzite of the Precambrian-age Big Cottonwood Formation near Lake Blanche, Big Cottonwood Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County. Photo by Adam Hiscock, UGS.

POTD March 29, 2016: Big Cottonwood Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County, Utah

I know there’s snow up in the Wasatch today, but the valley sure feels as nice as this photo!

POTD 3-29-16 Glacier Wasatch

Big Cottonwood Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County, Utah
Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2015

Glacially scoured and polished quartzite of the Precambrian-age Big Cottonwood Formation near Lake Blanche, Big Cottonwood Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County.

Utah’s Great Salt Lake is shrinking, experts say

accuweather.com

Human activity is playing a role in the dwindling size of Utah’s Great Salt Lake, according to new research.

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Delicate Arch, a 65-foot-tall natural arch in Arches National Park, Grand County, is composed of Jurassic-age sandstone including the Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone (base and pedestals) and Moab Member of the Curtis Formation (bridge). Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah Photographer: Marshall Robinson; © 2015

POTD March 23, 2016: Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

POTD 3-22-16 Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Marshall Robinson; © 2015

Delicate Arch, a 65-foot-tall natural arch in Arches National Park, Grand County, is composed of Jurassic-age sandstone including the Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone (base and pedestals) and Moab Member of the Curtis Formation (bridge).

Finding the past in Southern Utah

What are the “house-rules” of the outdoors? We talk a lot about “leave no trace,” but it’s also worth noting that if you find an artifact, fossil, or the like, it’s best to leave it undisturbed as you found it. Following these general rules will help keep Utah beautiful for generations to come!

thespectrum.com

You’re hiking in Southern Utah, you sit down to take a break, you look under a nearby ledge and low and behold, there’s an intact seed jar –  an artifact probably close to 1000 years old, left behind by the nomadic people who called this area home long before Europeans set foot on the continent. What do you do?

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