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POTD September 24, 2013: Goosenecks State Park, San Juan County, Utah

Goosenecks State Park, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Bill Lund

Deeply incised meanders form the goosenecks of the San Juan River at Goosenecks State Park, San Juan County.

POTD August 7, 2013: San Juan River near Mexican Hat, San Juan County, Utah

San Juan River near Mexican Hat, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Tyler Knudsen

Rock layers are folded in some areas of the Colorado Plateau, such as these on the flank of the Raplee anticline along the San Juan River near Mexican Hat, San Juan County.

POTD August 6, 2013: Island in the Sky District, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah

Island in the Sky District, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Lance Weaver

Deep canyons display headward erosion at Island in the Sky District, Canyonlands National Park.

POTD July 15, 2013: Navajo Indian Reservation, San Juan County, Utah

Navajo Indian Reservation, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Phil Powlick

The wind has formed ripples on the surface of a dune in Monument Valley along the Utah-Arizona border.

POTD June 17, 2013: Wilson Arch, San Juan County, Utah

Sixty years of Utah Geology will leave you with A LOT of photos, so we are going to share them with you. Introducing the UGS Photo Of The Day, or POTD for short. Enjoy!

 


San Juan County

Photographer: Michael Vanden Berg

Wilson Arch is probably the most accessible natural arch in southern Utah. It is perched on a cliff of the Jurassic-age Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone next to Highway 191 half way between Moab and Monticello. North of Moab, the Entrada Sandstone is host to the vast majority of the arches in Arches National Park.

GeoSights—Comb Ridge, San Juan County, Utah

One may say Comb Ridge was Mother Nature’s way of splitting southern San Juan County with an enormous
wall. Another may say it was a giant skateboard ramp for dinosaurs. One thing is certain: Comb Ridge is a spectacular
ridge of steeply tilted sandstone rock layers, trending north-south for approximately 80 miles from Utah’s Abajo Mountains to Kayenta, Arizona. Similar to a rooster’s comb, the jagged appearance of Comb Ridge provides the logic behind its name.