Posts

Sunset Drive Landslide

GEOLOGIC HAZARDS

2006 Sunset Drive Landslide, Layton, Davis County

By Richard Giraud, Greg McDonald, and Ashley Elliott




On the morning of April 15, 2006, homeowners recognized that the Sunset Drive landslide in Layton had reactivated. The landslide moved previously in 1998 and damaged a house that was later demolished.

The landslide is in a northwest-facing slope above the broad valley of the North Fork of Kays Creek. Landslide movement directly impacts two houses and the backyard landscaping at four other lots along the slope crest.

The 2006 landslide main scarp is in the same location as the 1998 scarp but the 2006 movement is greater and has created a higher main scarp at the slope crest and more ground cracks and other landslide features in the lower slope down to the North Fork of Kays Creek.

The slope that failed is made up of clay and sand deposited as part of the Weber River delta that had built into Lake Bonneville 16,000-18,000 years ago. The North Fork of Kays Creek valley formed as Lake Bonneville receded and the creek cut down through the old Weber River delta.

The clay and sand in the Weber River delta are prone to landsliding, and similar slopes in Layton, Uinta Highlands, South Weber, and Washington Terrace have failed repeatedly in the past. Prehistoric landslide deposits are present at the Sunset Drive landslide and elsewhere in the North Fork of Kays Creek valley.

The upper part of the landslide has been modified by the placement of fill for farming and subdivision development. Some of the houses along the slope crest rest partially on fill and partially on native material. The area of landsliding is about 650 to 700 feet wide and 550 feet long. The landslide has a vertical drop of about 160 feet and an average slope of 30%.

Following the 1998 landslide, Layton City conducted a landslide study to determine ground-water levels, depth of sliding, and soil strength. To improve landslide stability, engineers proposed a drain system at the slope crest, but the majority of homeowners decided not to finance the installation.

As part of the landslide study, Layton City installed instruments to measure slope movement and ground-water levels in the landslide. The Utah Geological Survey has monitored ground-water levels in the landslide since 1998. A 4- to 8- foot increase in ground-water levels between March 16 and April 17, 2006 apparently triggered landslide movement and is in part a result of the significant snow and rain that fell on April 6.

This rise in ground-water levels represents a measurable threshold that can be used to predict future landslide movement. New springs have appeared on the lower landslide. Instruments indicate the sliding surface of the 2006 landslide movement is 30 to 38 feet below the ground surface near mid-slope and likely deeper near the slope crest.

The Utah Geological Survey is assisting Layton City in monitoring landslide movement and measuring ground-water levels, and Layton City building inspectors are monitoring potential damage to the two houses directly threatened by the landslide. Much of northern Utah is experiencing a second consecutive wet year, following last year’s very active spring when the UGS recorded over 100 landslides.

Click here (pdf) for a diagram illustrating landslide features and terminology.

The UGS report Reconnaissance of a Landslide on East Sunset Drive, Layton, Utah(pdf) discussing the 1998 landslide is also available online (see pages 28-35).



This report is preliminary and subject to revision.

Creekside Drive Landslides

GEOLOGIC HAZARDS

2005-06 Creekside Drive Landslides, Mountain Green, Morgan County

By Francis Ashland and Greg McDonald



In the late winter or early spring of 2005, three landslides occurred in the Creekside Drive area of Mountain Green. The landslides consisted of two separate slides between a sewer line and Gordon Creek (SSL and NSL), and a larger active deep-seated landslide that underlies about five lots (6023) and also included a cluster of three small, shallow landslides on or abutting the slide.



In 2005, landsliding damaged the house, landscaped areas, and driveway at 6023 Creekside Drive, and resulted in some damage at two other nearby houses. In addition, cracking occurred in the pavement of Creekside Drive and on a vacant area north of the road. Movement of the two landslides by the sewer line destroyed land drains and formed vertical scarps on the downslope side of the sewer line.

The 2005 landslides were the result of partial or complete reactivation of previously mapped landslides that underlie the area. These landslides are in soils derived from the Tertiary Norwood Tuff, a geologic unit that contains weak, easily weathered volcanic deposits that are highly prone to landsliding.

Landslide movement continued at a very slow, nearly imperceptible rate for the remainder of the 2005 calendar year at the southernmost sewer-line landslide and the main (6023) landslide. In 2006, a snowmelt-induced rise in ground-water levels caused an increase in the rate of movement of the landslides, and also caused two (C and lot 18) new landslides. Movement in 2006 has further damaged the three houses on the main landslide, forcing the abandonment of the now severely damaged house at 6023 Creekside Drive, and disrupted buried electric and culinary water lines in the subdivision.

In June of 2005, the Utah Geological Survey (UGS) began monitoring landslide movement at the main and two sewer-line landslides. In November 2005, the UGS installed additional survey points and began using Global Positioning System survey techniques to accurately monitor movement amounts and direction, and to map the poorly defined boundaries of the main landslide. The results have helped to define the approximate limits of the main landslide. As of May 2006, movement continues, but ground deformation features, such as ground cracks and scarps, defining the entire perimeter of the main landslide are still lacking.




This report is preliminary and subject to revision.

Landsliding in Northern Utah, Early 2009

GEOLOGIC HAZARDS

Landsliding in Northern Utah, Early 2009

By Francis Ashland




Local wet conditions in northern Utah have caused some landslides to reactivate along with other types of shallow slope failures. Areas with active landslides in early 2009 include Ogden Valley in eastern Weber County, western Morgan County, southeastern Davis County, and Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah County. Examples include:

  1. reactivation or acceleration of persistently moving historical landslides,
  2. minor movement of landslides in highway cut slopes,
  3. local highway embankment and rock-wall failures, and
  4. local shallow slides on steep slopes in pre-existing landslides.

Damaging Landslide Movement

Above-normal precipitation in southeastern Davis County has caused an increase in the rate of movement of the Springhill landslide in North Salt Lake, resulting in additional damage to houses, roads, and buried utilities. The landslide has moved persistently since the late 1990s, severely damaging three houses since 1998.

By early 2009, the landslide was moving at a yearly rate of about 20 inches per year. Click here for additional information on the Springhill landslide.

Damaging landsliding has also occurred in Ogden Valley and the Snowbasin area of eastern Weber County. Snowmelt-induced landsliding occurred in the front yard of a house in the foothills of Ogden Valley, where saturated fill soil slid onto a driveway that crossed the slope.

Reactivation of pre-existing landslides crossed by State Route 226 (near Snowbasin ski resort) is causing minor damage to the highway in several locations. In addition, embankment failures along the edge of the highway are causing road cracks and pavement settlement.

Other Minor Landsliding

Landsliding coincident with the snowmelt was detected at several other sites this year including minor movement of the Frontier Drive landslide in Morgan County, a small landslide in a highway cut slope in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah County and a new small slide in a local steep slope in the head of the Sage Vista Lane landslide in Cedar Hills, Utah County.

Several landslides that occurred in generally south-facing slopes, including an embankment failure along US-6/89 in Spanish Fork Canyon, may have been caused by relatively rapid snowmelt. For the most part, no damage has resulted from these landslides.


Update on Springhill Landslide

GEOLOGIC HAZARDS

Update on Springhill Landslide

updated 07/12/2012


Summary of Landslide Movement and Conditions

This section summarizes landslide conditions from August 22, 2011 through July 10, 2012. Precipitation for the current water year is also discussed.

Landslide Movement

The Springhill landslide moved very slowly since August 22, 2011, but the rate of movement (the speed at which the landslide moved) was not constant. The landslide has shown a decrease in movement rates since our last update on May 1, 2012.

Measurements taken on July 10, 2012 indicate that the main scarp (uppermost part of the slide) is currently moving at approximately 0.0 to 0.2 inches per week, similar to the last reporting date (May 1, 2012). Movement of the toe (lowermost part of the slide) has decreased to less than 0.1 inches per week since the last reporting date (May 1, 2012). This decrease is likely due to below average precipitation in the first part of summer 2012.



Total measured ground deformation (the amount that the ground stretches or shortens as landslide movement occurs) since August 22, 2011 is about 0.0 to 0.4 inches across the main scarp. The table below summarizes the total measured ground deformation and movement from August 22, 2011 through July 10, 2012.

Small movement rates were observed from August 22, 2011 to July 10, 2012, continuing a significant rate reduction since spring and summer 2011. Rates are expected to stay the same or decrease through the summer months of 2012, due to lower than average precipitation during 2012, and therefore lower groundwater levels.

Summary of recent landslide movement and ground deformation measurements

Description Location Measurement Method

Measurement Period

Total Movement
(in.)

Estimated Error
(in.)

Ground deformation across main scarp zone Upslope of Springhill Circle Steel tape and survey stakes August 22, 2011 – July 10, 2012

0.0-0.4

±0.1

Ground deformation across toe Lot 157
Valley View Drive
Steel tape and survey stakes August 22, 2011 – July 10, 2012

0.4

±0.4

Movement monitoring Entire landslide and surrounding area Static survey-grade GNSS August 1, 2011 – April 4, 2012 1.8 ±0.4

Precipitation in 2012 and the 2012 Water Year

Precipitation at the landslide is estimated using data from the nearby Bountiful Val Verda National Weather Service station, approximately 1.5 miles northeast of the landslide. Precipitation for the 2012 calendar year has been 77 percent of normal. For water year 2011-2012 (October – September), precipitation is 75 percent of normal.

Groundwater Levels in 2011-2012

Rising groundwater levels can cause the rate of movement of a landslide to increase. Since the last reporting period (May 1, 2012), groundwater levels at wells P-3 and P-5 have decreased slightly, while well P-4 has stayed the same. Well P-1 has been clogged with mud since December 7, 2010, making a groundwater level measurement impossible. All current and historical Springhill landslide groundwater level data can be accessed through the UGS Groundwater Monitoring Data Portal. Users can create custom plots of water level data, download in CSV (comma separated value) format, or a well summary report may be viewed or downloaded in PDF format.

Future Landslide Movement

Based on continual movement since the beginning of 2010, with normal to above average precipitation, the UGS anticipates continued movement in 2012. However, due to lower than average precipitation levels since late summer 2011, movement has slowed since the latter part of 2011.

Based on landslide movement since 2005, the total annual movement amount may gradually increase (as it has since 2005), likely exceeding a foot or more each year (landslide movement in 2009 exceeded 12.5 inches). However, during extremely dry years, such as 2007 and 2012 thus far, movement may be slow or even suspend, and a prolonged dry period, such as a multi-year drought, may cause the landslide to become dormant (no movement for over a year).

However, because of the uncertainty in predicting the weather and water infiltration in future years, residents should prepare for future movement of the landslide, particularly given that significant damaging movement occurred in 2008, a year with near normal precipitation.

UGS Monitoring of the Landslide

Due to the slow rate of landslide movement, the UGS plans on monthly to quarterly groundwater and ground-deformation monitoring and periodic GNSS monitoring of the Springhill landslide when conditions revealed in the monitoring warrant. If precipitation amounts increase significantly, monitoring frequency will likely increase.

Summertime Landscape Watering

Residents should be aware that excessive summertime landscape watering may cause groundwater levels to rise, which may cause an increase in the rate of movement.

The observed rise in groundwater level in late April and May, 2009, and in late June, 2010, in observation wells P-1 and P-4 may have been caused, at least in part, by local landscape watering. The temporary rise in groundwater level caused by landscape watering interrupts the natural decline that generally occurs in the summer and early fall, leaving the level higher at the end of the year than it would have been without landscape watering. This will result in a higher groundwater level in the following year, and thus, less snowpack is needed to cause a similar rise in groundwater levels as in the previous year, increasing the likelihood of future damaging movement.

In addition to landscape watering, residents should also watch for broken water pipes and sewer lines and report (if municipality owned) or fix them immediately to prevent excessive water infiltration into the landslide.


National Weather Service Stresses Importance of Maintaining Weather Stations

kutv.com

High in the hills above the city of Alpine in Utah County is a critical piece of equipment that could save lives should a sudden flood occur.

READ MORE

A look back on the Bingham Canyon Mine Landslide

earthsky.org

This date in science: Landslide at Bingham Canyon Mine

April 10, 2013. On this date – a year ago today – a towering wall of dirt and rocks gave way and crashed down the side of Bingham Canyon Mine in Utah. The landslide was to be one of the largest non-volcanic landslides in the history of North America. University of Utah researchers later reported that the landslide – which moved at an average of almost 70 mph and reached estimated speeds of at least 100 mph – left a deposit so large it would cover New York’s Central Park with about 20 meters (66 feet) of debris.

READ MORE

POTD February 12, 2014: Wasatch Plateau, eastern Sanpete County, Utah

Wasatch Plateau, eastern Sanpete County, Utah
Photographer: Rich Giraud; © 2011

The lower part of the Slide Lake landslide has averaged 14 feet of movement per year between 2004 and 2009. The landslide occurred in the Tertiary-Cretaceous-age North Horn Formation, which is known for producing many large landslides. Near Joes Valley Reservoir, the 1.2 miles long landslide deflects Seely Creek.

Kennecott slide triggered 16 earthquakes, study shows

deseretnews.com

The gargantuan awe-inspiring landslide at Kennecott’s Bingham Canyon mine last April was so stunning, the “firsts” and “mosts” it accomplished are something wild to ponder.

READ MORE

 

Read further at The Salt Lake Tribune with this article—sltrib.com
“Kennecott landslide so big it triggered earthquakes

Accelerating to speeds of up to 100 miles per hour, April’s massive landslide in Kennecott’s Bingham Canyon mine actually triggered earthquakes, the first time that is known to have occurred.

READ MORE

Survey Notes volume 45 number 3

Current Issue Contents:

  • Damaging Debris Flows Prompt Landslide Inventory Mapping for the 2012 Seely Fire, Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah
  • Rock Fall: An Increasing Hazard in Urbanizing Southwestern Utah
  • New Geologic Data Resources for Utah
  • Energy News
  • Teacher’s Corner
  • Glad You Asked: Where is the Coolest Spot in Utah?
  • GeoSights: The Goosenecks of the San Juan River, San Juan County, Utah
  • Survey News
  • New Publications

    GET IT HERE
    PAST ISSUES

NORTH SALT LAKE RESIDENTS RALLY TO HELP LANDSLIDE VICTIMS

sltrib.com

Insurance companies have given no help to some North Salt Lake residents whose homes are being destroyed by a slow-moving landslide. Nor has the federal government. But their neighbors did on Saturday — rallying with a community breakfast and fun run to raise money to help.

“I’m glad somebody — somebody — is helping. We need it,” said Stefanie Christiansen, whose home is being torn apart slowly. She, like many of her neighbors on Springhill Circle and Springhill Drive, were among the volunteer cooks and servers Saturday during the breakfast at Foxboro Regional Park.

As she was helping serve hot pancakes to neighbors paying $5 each, she said, “We really appreciate what people are doing for us. It means a lot.”

She said she and her husband bought their house on Springhill Drive in the foothills 15 years ago.

“Then in 1998, we had some movement from the landslide. Then it was fine for a lot of years,” she said. But more recently, it started moving again — about an inch a year — cracking foundations and walls, and tearing apart homes.

READ MORE

MORE INFO

Pages

Sunset Drive Landslide

GEOLOGIC HAZARDS

2006 Sunset Drive Landslide, Layton, Davis County

By Richard Giraud, Greg McDonald, and Ashley Elliott




On the morning of April 15, 2006, homeowners recognized that the Sunset Drive landslide in Layton had reactivated. The landslide moved previously in 1998 and damaged a house that was later demolished.

The landslide is in a northwest-facing slope above the broad valley of the North Fork of Kays Creek. Landslide movement directly impacts two houses and the backyard landscaping at four other lots along the slope crest.

The 2006 landslide main scarp is in the same location as the 1998 scarp but the 2006 movement is greater and has created a higher main scarp at the slope crest and more ground cracks and other landslide features in the lower slope down to the North Fork of Kays Creek.

The slope that failed is made up of clay and sand deposited as part of the Weber River delta that had built into Lake Bonneville 16,000-18,000 years ago. The North Fork of Kays Creek valley formed as Lake Bonneville receded and the creek cut down through the old Weber River delta.

The clay and sand in the Weber River delta are prone to landsliding, and similar slopes in Layton, Uinta Highlands, South Weber, and Washington Terrace have failed repeatedly in the past. Prehistoric landslide deposits are present at the Sunset Drive landslide and elsewhere in the North Fork of Kays Creek valley.

The upper part of the landslide has been modified by the placement of fill for farming and subdivision development. Some of the houses along the slope crest rest partially on fill and partially on native material. The area of landsliding is about 650 to 700 feet wide and 550 feet long. The landslide has a vertical drop of about 160 feet and an average slope of 30%.

Following the 1998 landslide, Layton City conducted a landslide study to determine ground-water levels, depth of sliding, and soil strength. To improve landslide stability, engineers proposed a drain system at the slope crest, but the majority of homeowners decided not to finance the installation.

As part of the landslide study, Layton City installed instruments to measure slope movement and ground-water levels in the landslide. The Utah Geological Survey has monitored ground-water levels in the landslide since 1998. A 4- to 8- foot increase in ground-water levels between March 16 and April 17, 2006 apparently triggered landslide movement and is in part a result of the significant snow and rain that fell on April 6.

This rise in ground-water levels represents a measurable threshold that can be used to predict future landslide movement. New springs have appeared on the lower landslide. Instruments indicate the sliding surface of the 2006 landslide movement is 30 to 38 feet below the ground surface near mid-slope and likely deeper near the slope crest.

The Utah Geological Survey is assisting Layton City in monitoring landslide movement and measuring ground-water levels, and Layton City building inspectors are monitoring potential damage to the two houses directly threatened by the landslide. Much of northern Utah is experiencing a second consecutive wet year, following last year’s very active spring when the UGS recorded over 100 landslides.

Click here (pdf) for a diagram illustrating landslide features and terminology.

The UGS report Reconnaissance of a Landslide on East Sunset Drive, Layton, Utah(pdf) discussing the 1998 landslide is also available online (see pages 28-35).



This report is preliminary and subject to revision.

Creekside Drive Landslides

GEOLOGIC HAZARDS

2005-06 Creekside Drive Landslides, Mountain Green, Morgan County

By Francis Ashland and Greg McDonald



In the late winter or early spring of 2005, three landslides occurred in the Creekside Drive area of Mountain Green. The landslides consisted of two separate slides between a sewer line and Gordon Creek (SSL and NSL), and a larger active deep-seated landslide that underlies about five lots (6023) and also included a cluster of three small, shallow landslides on or abutting the slide.



In 2005, landsliding damaged the house, landscaped areas, and driveway at 6023 Creekside Drive, and resulted in some damage at two other nearby houses. In addition, cracking occurred in the pavement of Creekside Drive and on a vacant area north of the road. Movement of the two landslides by the sewer line destroyed land drains and formed vertical scarps on the downslope side of the sewer line.

The 2005 landslides were the result of partial or complete reactivation of previously mapped landslides that underlie the area. These landslides are in soils derived from the Tertiary Norwood Tuff, a geologic unit that contains weak, easily weathered volcanic deposits that are highly prone to landsliding.

Landslide movement continued at a very slow, nearly imperceptible rate for the remainder of the 2005 calendar year at the southernmost sewer-line landslide and the main (6023) landslide. In 2006, a snowmelt-induced rise in ground-water levels caused an increase in the rate of movement of the landslides, and also caused two (C and lot 18) new landslides. Movement in 2006 has further damaged the three houses on the main landslide, forcing the abandonment of the now severely damaged house at 6023 Creekside Drive, and disrupted buried electric and culinary water lines in the subdivision.

In June of 2005, the Utah Geological Survey (UGS) began monitoring landslide movement at the main and two sewer-line landslides. In November 2005, the UGS installed additional survey points and began using Global Positioning System survey techniques to accurately monitor movement amounts and direction, and to map the poorly defined boundaries of the main landslide. The results have helped to define the approximate limits of the main landslide. As of May 2006, movement continues, but ground deformation features, such as ground cracks and scarps, defining the entire perimeter of the main landslide are still lacking.




This report is preliminary and subject to revision.

Landsliding in Northern Utah, Early 2009

GEOLOGIC HAZARDS

Landsliding in Northern Utah, Early 2009

By Francis Ashland




Local wet conditions in northern Utah have caused some landslides to reactivate along with other types of shallow slope failures. Areas with active landslides in early 2009 include Ogden Valley in eastern Weber County, western Morgan County, southeastern Davis County, and Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah County. Examples include:

  1. reactivation or acceleration of persistently moving historical landslides,
  2. minor movement of landslides in highway cut slopes,
  3. local highway embankment and rock-wall failures, and
  4. local shallow slides on steep slopes in pre-existing landslides.

Damaging Landslide Movement

Above-normal precipitation in southeastern Davis County has caused an increase in the rate of movement of the Springhill landslide in North Salt Lake, resulting in additional damage to houses, roads, and buried utilities. The landslide has moved persistently since the late 1990s, severely damaging three houses since 1998.

By early 2009, the landslide was moving at a yearly rate of about 20 inches per year. Click here for additional information on the Springhill landslide.

Damaging landsliding has also occurred in Ogden Valley and the Snowbasin area of eastern Weber County. Snowmelt-induced landsliding occurred in the front yard of a house in the foothills of Ogden Valley, where saturated fill soil slid onto a driveway that crossed the slope.

Reactivation of pre-existing landslides crossed by State Route 226 (near Snowbasin ski resort) is causing minor damage to the highway in several locations. In addition, embankment failures along the edge of the highway are causing road cracks and pavement settlement.

Other Minor Landsliding

Landsliding coincident with the snowmelt was detected at several other sites this year including minor movement of the Frontier Drive landslide in Morgan County, a small landslide in a highway cut slope in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah County and a new small slide in a local steep slope in the head of the Sage Vista Lane landslide in Cedar Hills, Utah County.

Several landslides that occurred in generally south-facing slopes, including an embankment failure along US-6/89 in Spanish Fork Canyon, may have been caused by relatively rapid snowmelt. For the most part, no damage has resulted from these landslides.


Update on Springhill Landslide

GEOLOGIC HAZARDS

Update on Springhill Landslide

updated 07/12/2012


Summary of Landslide Movement and Conditions

This section summarizes landslide conditions from August 22, 2011 through July 10, 2012. Precipitation for the current water year is also discussed.

Landslide Movement

The Springhill landslide moved very slowly since August 22, 2011, but the rate of movement (the speed at which the landslide moved) was not constant. The landslide has shown a decrease in movement rates since our last update on May 1, 2012.

Measurements taken on July 10, 2012 indicate that the main scarp (uppermost part of the slide) is currently moving at approximately 0.0 to 0.2 inches per week, similar to the last reporting date (May 1, 2012). Movement of the toe (lowermost part of the slide) has decreased to less than 0.1 inches per week since the last reporting date (May 1, 2012). This decrease is likely due to below average precipitation in the first part of summer 2012.



Total measured ground deformation (the amount that the ground stretches or shortens as landslide movement occurs) since August 22, 2011 is about 0.0 to 0.4 inches across the main scarp. The table below summarizes the total measured ground deformation and movement from August 22, 2011 through July 10, 2012.

Small movement rates were observed from August 22, 2011 to July 10, 2012, continuing a significant rate reduction since spring and summer 2011. Rates are expected to stay the same or decrease through the summer months of 2012, due to lower than average precipitation during 2012, and therefore lower groundwater levels.

Summary of recent landslide movement and ground deformation measurements

Description Location Measurement Method

Measurement Period

Total Movement
(in.)

Estimated Error
(in.)

Ground deformation across main scarp zone Upslope of Springhill Circle Steel tape and survey stakes August 22, 2011 – July 10, 2012

0.0-0.4

±0.1

Ground deformation across toe Lot 157
Valley View Drive
Steel tape and survey stakes August 22, 2011 – July 10, 2012

0.4

±0.4

Movement monitoring Entire landslide and surrounding area Static survey-grade GNSS August 1, 2011 – April 4, 2012 1.8 ±0.4

Precipitation in 2012 and the 2012 Water Year

Precipitation at the landslide is estimated using data from the nearby Bountiful Val Verda National Weather Service station, approximately 1.5 miles northeast of the landslide. Precipitation for the 2012 calendar year has been 77 percent of normal. For water year 2011-2012 (October – September), precipitation is 75 percent of normal.

Groundwater Levels in 2011-2012

Rising groundwater levels can cause the rate of movement of a landslide to increase. Since the last reporting period (May 1, 2012), groundwater levels at wells P-3 and P-5 have decreased slightly, while well P-4 has stayed the same. Well P-1 has been clogged with mud since December 7, 2010, making a groundwater level measurement impossible. All current and historical Springhill landslide groundwater level data can be accessed through the UGS Groundwater Monitoring Data Portal. Users can create custom plots of water level data, download in CSV (comma separated value) format, or a well summary report may be viewed or downloaded in PDF format.

Future Landslide Movement

Based on continual movement since the beginning of 2010, with normal to above average precipitation, the UGS anticipates continued movement in 2012. However, due to lower than average precipitation levels since late summer 2011, movement has slowed since the latter part of 2011.

Based on landslide movement since 2005, the total annual movement amount may gradually increase (as it has since 2005), likely exceeding a foot or more each year (landslide movement in 2009 exceeded 12.5 inches). However, during extremely dry years, such as 2007 and 2012 thus far, movement may be slow or even suspend, and a prolonged dry period, such as a multi-year drought, may cause the landslide to become dormant (no movement for over a year).

However, because of the uncertainty in predicting the weather and water infiltration in future years, residents should prepare for future movement of the landslide, particularly given that significant damaging movement occurred in 2008, a year with near normal precipitation.

UGS Monitoring of the Landslide

Due to the slow rate of landslide movement, the UGS plans on monthly to quarterly groundwater and ground-deformation monitoring and periodic GNSS monitoring of the Springhill landslide when conditions revealed in the monitoring warrant. If precipitation amounts increase significantly, monitoring frequency will likely increase.

Summertime Landscape Watering

Residents should be aware that excessive summertime landscape watering may cause groundwater levels to rise, which may cause an increase in the rate of movement.

The observed rise in groundwater level in late April and May, 2009, and in late June, 2010, in observation wells P-1 and P-4 may have been caused, at least in part, by local landscape watering. The temporary rise in groundwater level caused by landscape watering interrupts the natural decline that generally occurs in the summer and early fall, leaving the level higher at the end of the year than it would have been without landscape watering. This will result in a higher groundwater level in the following year, and thus, less snowpack is needed to cause a similar rise in groundwater levels as in the previous year, increasing the likelihood of future damaging movement.

In addition to landscape watering, residents should also watch for broken water pipes and sewer lines and report (if municipality owned) or fix them immediately to prevent excessive water infiltration into the landslide.


National Weather Service Stresses Importance of Maintaining Weather Stations

kutv.com

High in the hills above the city of Alpine in Utah County is a critical piece of equipment that could save lives should a sudden flood occur.

READ MORE

A look back on the Bingham Canyon Mine Landslide

earthsky.org

This date in science: Landslide at Bingham Canyon Mine

April 10, 2013. On this date – a year ago today – a towering wall of dirt and rocks gave way and crashed down the side of Bingham Canyon Mine in Utah. The landslide was to be one of the largest non-volcanic landslides in the history of North America. University of Utah researchers later reported that the landslide – which moved at an average of almost 70 mph and reached estimated speeds of at least 100 mph – left a deposit so large it would cover New York’s Central Park with about 20 meters (66 feet) of debris.

READ MORE

POTD February 12, 2014: Wasatch Plateau, eastern Sanpete County, Utah

Wasatch Plateau, eastern Sanpete County, Utah
Photographer: Rich Giraud; © 2011

The lower part of the Slide Lake landslide has averaged 14 feet of movement per year between 2004 and 2009. The landslide occurred in the Tertiary-Cretaceous-age North Horn Formation, which is known for producing many large landslides. Near Joes Valley Reservoir, the 1.2 miles long landslide deflects Seely Creek.

Kennecott slide triggered 16 earthquakes, study shows

deseretnews.com

The gargantuan awe-inspiring landslide at Kennecott’s Bingham Canyon mine last April was so stunning, the “firsts” and “mosts” it accomplished are something wild to ponder.

READ MORE

 

Read further at The Salt Lake Tribune with this article—sltrib.com
“Kennecott landslide so big it triggered earthquakes

Accelerating to speeds of up to 100 miles per hour, April’s massive landslide in Kennecott’s Bingham Canyon mine actually triggered earthquakes, the first time that is known to have occurred.

READ MORE

Survey Notes volume 45 number 3

Current Issue Contents:

  • Damaging Debris Flows Prompt Landslide Inventory Mapping for the 2012 Seely Fire, Carbon and Emery Counties, Utah
  • Rock Fall: An Increasing Hazard in Urbanizing Southwestern Utah
  • New Geologic Data Resources for Utah
  • Energy News
  • Teacher’s Corner
  • Glad You Asked: Where is the Coolest Spot in Utah?
  • GeoSights: The Goosenecks of the San Juan River, San Juan County, Utah
  • Survey News
  • New Publications

    GET IT HERE
    PAST ISSUES

NORTH SALT LAKE RESIDENTS RALLY TO HELP LANDSLIDE VICTIMS

sltrib.com

Insurance companies have given no help to some North Salt Lake residents whose homes are being destroyed by a slow-moving landslide. Nor has the federal government. But their neighbors did on Saturday — rallying with a community breakfast and fun run to raise money to help.

“I’m glad somebody — somebody — is helping. We need it,” said Stefanie Christiansen, whose home is being torn apart slowly. She, like many of her neighbors on Springhill Circle and Springhill Drive, were among the volunteer cooks and servers Saturday during the breakfast at Foxboro Regional Park.

As she was helping serve hot pancakes to neighbors paying $5 each, she said, “We really appreciate what people are doing for us. It means a lot.”

She said she and her husband bought their house on Springhill Drive in the foothills 15 years ago.

“Then in 1998, we had some movement from the landslide. Then it was fine for a lot of years,” she said. But more recently, it started moving again — about an inch a year — cracking foundations and walls, and tearing apart homes.

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