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POTD February 27, 2018

Colorado River, Cane Creek anticline, and potash evaporation ponds, San Juan County
Photographer: Adam Hiscock © 2018

POTD February 28, 2017

View east from Jackson Bottom along the Colorado River, Grand County.
Photographer: Brian Butler © 2017

POTD September 6, 2016

9-6-16
Along the Colorado River, Grand County
Photographer: Ryhan Sempler © 2016
Cane Creek anticline and the Colorado River, Grand County, Utah Photographer: Rebekah Stimpson; © 2015

POTD October 27, 2015: Cane Creek anticline and the Colorado River, Grand County, Utah

A view to drink in over your lunch time daydream.

POTD 10-27-15

Cane Creek anticline and the Colorado River, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Rebekah Stimpson; © 2015

 

The Colorado River loops around the Gooseneck between Dead Horse Point State Park and distant cliffs of the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park. The river has carved and exposed nearly flat-lying Jurassic to Pennsylvanian-age sedimentary strata of the Colorado Plateau. Dead Horse Point State Park, San Juan County, Utah Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

POTD May 19, 2015: Dead Horse Point State Park, San Juan County, Utah

While this photo is a throwback to colder seasons, we cannot deny the stunning #UtahGeology present. This crisp, cold picture is worth a thousand hand warmers—that’s how the saying goes, right?

POTD 5-12-15 Dead Horse Point San juan

Dead Horse Point State Park, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

The Colorado River loops around the Gooseneck between Dead Horse Point State Park and distant cliffs of the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park. The river has carved and exposed nearly flat-lying Jurassic to Pennsylvanian-age sedimentary strata of the Colorado Plateau.

Late-winter ice still clings to the Colorado River near Big Bend, north of Moab. Boulders of Jurassic-age Wingate Sandstone and Triassic-age Chinle Formation line the banks of the river, eroded from the cliffs and ledges cut by the river as it has incised its channel over millions of years. Colorado River, Grand County, Utah Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2014

POTD January 6, 2015: Colorado River, Grand County, Utah

POTD 1-6-15 Colorado River, Grand County, Utah

Colorado River, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2014

Late-winter ice still clings to the Colorado River near Big Bend, north of Moab. Boulders of Jurassic-age Wingate Sandstone and Triassic-age Chinle Formation line the banks of the river, eroded from the cliffs and ledges cut by the river as it has incised its channel over millions of years.

Colorado River researchers find signs of ancient, devastating floods

In more recent times, focus has been on the drought conditions affecting Southern Utah and the Colorado River. But what if the Colorado River were flooding? An interesting insight to the river’s extreme flood history, and research for better understanding of the rare events.

latimes.com

Scientists say it would have been a catastrophe of unprecedented proportions. If the Glen Canyon Dam had failed, it would have changed the lives of millions of people and reshaped the history of the American West.

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POTD February 10, 2014: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, San Juan County, Utah

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Don DeBlieux; © 2011

Dinosaur tracks on a block of fallen Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone. North of the confluence of the San Juan and Colorado Rivers, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, San Juan County.

Glad You Asked—Why Does A River Run Through It?

river-runs-through-it Jim Davis

Even though we are a “desert” state, Utah’s rivers are world-renowned among river runners and geoscientists. Several of America’s early geologists, including G.K. Gilbert, W.M. Davis, C.E. Dutton, and J.W. Powell contributed to theories of stream evolution from observations made in Utah.

Rivers typically originate in the mountains, flow away from them in a more-or-less constant direction, enter increasingly broad river plains, and terminate at an ocean. But many rivers in Utah flow toward and across mountains, run contrary to valleys, make U-turns, and many never reach the ocean.

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