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POTD March 07, 2017: Needles District, Canyonlands National Park

Needles District, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County
Photographer: J. Lucy Jordan © 2017

POTD November 8, 2016: Canyonlands National Park, Wayne County

Columns of Permian-age Organ Rock Shale seemingly defy gravity in the Land of Standing Rocks in the remote Maze district of Canyonlands National Park, Wayne County.

Photographer: Tyler Knudsen © 2016

11-8-16

 

White Rim, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah Photographer: Tyler Knudsen; © 2015

POTD November 10, 2015: White Rim, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah

POTD Canyonlands 11-10-15

White Rim, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Tyler Knudsen; © 2015

Sandstone Arches and National Parks: Testing for Collapse Likelihood

natureworldnews.com

Things are humming right along at Arches National Park.

That is, scientists who wondered about possible internal damage in the 88-foot-long Mesa Arch at Canyonlands National Park-one of more than 2,000 sandstone arches in two national parks in that part of Utah–now have an answer. They learned by employing seismometers to hear the arches’ natural humming, then monitored the sounds for telling changes. Their report was recently accepted for publication in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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Mesa Arch, in the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park, formed as surface water pooled and eventually eroded through bedrock at the mesa’s edge. As the sun rises, its rays reflect off the 800-foot-high cliff of Jurassic-age sedimentary rock below the arch, bathing the bottom of the arch in an orange glow. Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

POTD June 17, 2015: Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah

We woke up on the right side of the bedrock today!

POTD 6-9-15 Mesa Arch Canyonlands

Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

Mesa Arch, in the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park, formed as surface water pooled and eventually eroded through bedrock at the mesa’s edge. As the sun rises, its rays reflect off the 800-foot-high cliff of Jurassic-age sedimentary rock below the arch, bathing the bottom of the arch in an orange glow.

Needles District, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2014

POTD May 5, 2015: Needles District, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah

POTD 5-5-15 Needles District Canyonlands

Needles District, Canyonlands National Park, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2014

 

Photos: Utah’s National Parks

For those of our friends that can’t get out into the outdoor wonder-world this weekend, here are some stunning photos to keep you company.

travel.nationalgeographic.com

SEE THEM HERE

 

The Doll House, Maze District of Canyonlands National Park, Wayne County, Utah Photographer: Tyler Knudsen; © 2014

POTD March 24, 2015: The Doll House, Maze District of Canyonlands National Park, Wayne County, Utah

POTD 3-24-15, doll house, Canyonlands

Not everyone grows up with this kind of doll house! We’re having southern Utah geology day dreams today.

The Doll House, Maze District of Canyonlands National Park, Wayne County, Utah
Photographer: Tyler Knudsen; © 2014

The Geology Of Canyonlands National Park

nationalparkstraveler.com

Baked by time like some multi-layer geologic tort, Canyonlands National Park in southeastern Utah features a landscape cut by canyons, rumpled by upthrusts, dimpled by grabens, and even pockmarked, some believe, by ancient asteroids.

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