sciencedaily.com

More than half of the streamflow in the Upper Colorado River Basin originates as groundwater, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey study published in the journal Water Resources Research.

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geology.utah.gov

The Utah Geological Survey (UGS) has made the Utah Quaternary Fault and Fold Database available through a new interactive web application on the UGS website. This database contains information on faults and fault-related folds considered to be potential earthquake sources. The faults and folds in the database are considered to have been sources of large earthquakes (about magnitude 6.5 or greater) during the Quaternary geologic time period (past 2.6 million years); these geologic structures are the most likely sources of large earthquakes in the future. The Utah Quaternary Fault and Fold Database is the primary source of Utah data for the Quaternary Fault and Fold Database of the United States maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

The interactive map’s user interface was built using ESRI’s JavaScript API. Several search options allow the user to locate a fault of interest, or specify a location to see if any Quaternary faults are nearby. Pop-up windows provide a brief summary of important information associated with the faults, as well as a link to detailed reports available through the USGS national database. Users can select from a variety of basemaps including topographic, shaded relief, and satellite imagery. A glossary explains terms used in the pop-up windows as well as terms used in the detailed reports that may be unfamiliar to non-geologists.

In addition to the UGS interactive map, the Utah Quaternary Fault and Fold Database exists as a fully attributed GIS feature class in the State Geographic Information Database, and can be downloaded from the AGRC at http://gis.utah.gov/data/geoscience/quaternary-faults.

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washingtonpost.com

The river of ice that hugs Mount Grinnell’s high ridges is neither big nor particularly beautiful, but it may be the most accessible glacier in all of North America. In as little as three hours, an average hiker can traverse the mountain’s well-groomed trail to plant a foot on a frozen relic of the Little Ice Age.

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sltrib.com

At the northern end of a small but rapidly growing southern Utah community lies a modern ghost town.

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fox13now.com

A landslide in a Riverton neighborhood Thursday afternoon left a 30-foot wide, and 40-foot tall hole on a hillside between two homes.

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smithsonianmag.com

The world’s worst mass extinction has been a great whodunit for decades. Some 252 million years ago, 75 percent of land species and 90 percent of those in the oceans disappeared. But what caused trilobites, Eurypterid “sea scorpions” and all those other species to go extinct?

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UGS geologists conducting a trench investigation to gather fault and earthquake data.

We hope you all had an enjoyable and safe long Labor Day weekend! Here’s a little story for the Tuesday morning catchup. A research team, including some of our UGS geologists, are studying a portion of the Taylorsville-West Valley City Fault to gain a better sense of past earthquakes on the fault. Read more!

fox13now.com

A research team is digging up a portion of the Taylorsville-West Valley City Fault out by the Salt Lake City International Airport, and their goal is to get a better sense of the danger from that fault and how big of an earthquake it could create.

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phys.org

Much of what we understand about earthquakes is based on plate tectonics. But for residents of Utah’s seismically restless Wasatch Front, a 120-mile-long metropolitan region anchored by Salt Lake City and bounded by the steep Wasatch Mountains and Great Salt Lake, such theory has fundamental limitations.

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nationalgeographic.com

Claim to fame: In 2001, paleontologists Jim Kirkland and Doug Wolfe named a very strange dinosaur. Relatively little of its skeleton was known – a few vertebrae, part of an arm, part of a leg, and a piece of hip bone found in northern New Mexico – but it was enough to identify the animal as one of the tubby, fuzzy, long-necked, large-clawed herbivores called therizinosaurs. They named the species Nothronychus mckinleyi.

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fox13now.com

The red rock arches of southeastern Utah attract visitors from around the world. The majestic structures have stood for thousands of years, but they could possibly collapse over time.

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