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New Geologic Maps of Parts of Utah Valley and Adjacent Areas

The Utah Geological Survey’s newest geologic maps could prove useful in efforts to address geologic hazard and resource issues in Utah County. The maps cover parts of central and southern Utah Valley and surrounding areas.

The maps, each of which covers an area of about 55 square miles, include the Goshen Valley North (Map 230), Lincoln Point (Map 232), Provo (Map 233), Soldiers Pass (Map 235), and West Mountain (Map 234) 7.5’ quadrangles. Collectively, the maps include West Mountain, the southern part of the Lake Mountains, and parts of Goshen and Utah Valleys, as well as parts of the communities of Provo, Springville, Spanish Fork, and Payson.

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GET THEM HERE

M-230
M-232
M-233
M-234
M-235

MAP 233

m-2331

GEOLOGIC MAP OF THE PROVO 7.5′ QUADRANGLE, UTAH COUNTY, UTAH
Barry J. Solomon and Michael N. Machette

The Provo 7.5′ quadrangle covers east-central Utah Valley and includes Provo, the third largest city in Utah.  Hobble Creek, the Provo River, and Spanish Fork are the primary streams in the quadrangle, flowing westward from the Wasatch Range to the Provo Bay portion of Utah Lake.  U.S. Interstate Highway 15 extends from north to south through the map area.  Included are two plates—a geologic map at 1:24,000 scale and an explanation sheet.
2 pl., scale 1:24,000, ISBN 1-55791-799-X, (supercedes OFR-525)

M-233……..$11.95

GET IT HERE

Rock Fall in Provo, April 11, 2009

rock-fall-2009Around 11:30 a.m. on April 11, 2009, a rock fall impacted the area of 1500 North and 1550 East in Provo, Utah.

One rock-fall boulder damaged the outside of a playhouse located at 1522 North 1550 East, and another, larger boulder severely damaged a vacant house at 1496 North 1550 East.

The April 11, 2009 rock fall occurred one lot north of the May 12, 2005 “Y” Mountain rock fall.

The rock fall occurred shortly after a storm on April 8-9 that dropped 1.5 inches of precipitation in less than 18 hours at the Cascade Mountain Snotel site, 3 miles southeast of the rock-fall source area.

Impact craters (bounce marks) evident on the slope above the houses indicate several rocks traveled downslope. The rocks traveled an estimated one mile downslope, and likely achieved high velocities as they bounced and rolled.

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Related Links

2005 Provo Rock Fall

Rock-Fall hazards