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The Green River forms a dramatic “gooseneck” near Sand Wash in upper Desolation Canyon. The river has incised into rocks of the Douglas Creek and Parachute Creek Members of the Tertiary-age Green River Formation, which comprises sediments that accumulated in ancient Lake Uinta. Desolation Canyon, Uintah County, Utah Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2014

POTD February 3, 2015: Desolation Canyon, Uintah County, Utah

Hey friends, we’ve finally made way with our new website! Visit geology.utah.gov to see our new look. Though, as most technical endeavors, we’ve encountered some difficulties. Switching the URLs erased our subscription list, and those who subscribed to our “New Blog,” you will have to re-subscribe. We apologize for the inconvenience, but we hope you’ll forgive us when you see this pretty picture of Utah geology.

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POTD 2-3-15 Desolation Canyon, Uintah County, Green River

Desolation Canyon, Uintah County, Utah
Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2014

The Green River forms a dramatic “gooseneck” near Sand Wash in upper Desolation Canyon. The river has incised into rocks of the Douglas Creek and Parachute Creek Members of the Tertiary-age Green River Formation, which comprises sediments that accumulated in ancient Lake Uinta.

Throwback Thursday May 8, 2014: Woodside, Utah

After perusing through some of our old pictures, this gem showed up for today’s #throwbackthursday geology/history lesson. This old postcard shows off the geyser in Woodside, UT which is now merely a railroad ghost town (and a llama) along Highway 6 about 25 miles north of Green River. Like Crystal Geyser, the geyser in Woodside is also carbon dioxide driven and erupts from an old well. #tbt

Perhaps some of you remember KSL’s article of the town’s sale. Read the article HERE.

Utah's popular 'soda-pop geyser' is fizzling out

A deeper look at one of our recent “Spot the Rock” sights, Crystal Geyser.

ksl.com

One of Utah’s most unusual tourist attractions is dying.

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POTD April 15, 2014: Canyonlands National Park, San Juan and Wayne Counties, Utah

Canyonlands National Park, San Juan and Wayne Counties, Utah
Photographer: Rich Emerson; © 2012

Uplift of the Colorado Plateau has caused the Green River to entrench its meandering path into the relatively soft rocks of the Permian-age Organ Rock Shale. At Soda Springs Basin, vertical cliffs of the more-resistant White Rim Sandstone cap the Organ Rock Shale 400 feet above the river.

POTD March 11, 2014: Green River, Uintah County, Utah

Green River, Uintah County, Utah
Photographer: Stefan Kirby; ©2011

Morning light on layered rocks of the Tertiary-age Green River Formation north of Desolation Canyon along the Green River.

POTD January 6, 2014: Green River, San Rafael Desert, Emery County, Utah

Green River, San Rafael Desert, Emery County, Utah
Photographer: Tom Chidsey

An ancient, meandering river channel composed of resistant sandstone in the Cedar Mountain Formation now stands 100 feet higher than the surrounding, less resistant siltstone and shale landscape southwest of Green River, San Rafael Desert, Emery County.

POTD July 17, 2013: Crystal Geyser, Green River, Grand County, Utah

Crystal Geyser, Green River, Grand County, Utah.
Photographer: Taylor Boden

Colorful travertine (calcium carbonate) is deposited around cold-water, carbon-dioxide-driven Crystal Geyser.

Unconventional Uteland Butte Sparks New Utah Activity

aapg.org

Geologic intervals that may have looked a bit ho-hum when pierced by the drill bit on its way to the Real Target can, on second look, yield some pleasant surprises.

The Uteland Butte Member of the Eocene Green River Formation in the Uinta Basin in Utah is one of these.

It’s the basal member of the Green River, above the Upper Paleocene to Lower Eocene Wasatch Formation, which is predominantly a sandstone with red, green and gray shales deposited in a fluvial setting.

In contrast, the Uteland Butte is indicative of a lacustrine environment and is mainly limestone, dolomite, organic rich calcareous mudstone and siltstone, with some thin sandstones, according to AAPG member Michael Vanden Berg.

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POTD July 9, 2013: East of the Green River, Grand County, Utah.

East of the Green River, Grand County, Utah.

Photographer: Don DeBlieux

A summer evening arrives with the promise of cooler temperatures at the UGS paleontology camp near the Crystal Geyser Dinosaur Quarry.

NEW DINOSAURS DISCOVERED

thefutureofthings.com

Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and the Utah Geological Survey in Salt Lake City discovered and classified the skeletons of two new species of dinosaurs. Dated to the Early Cretaceous Epoch (approximately 145.5 to 99.6 million years ago), both are beaked herbivorous dinosaurs classified as iguanodonts. The two skeletons were found at different sites in Utah, one near Green River and the other near Arches National Park.

The first new species of dinosaur is hippodraco scutodens. The first part of the name means “horse dragon,” and the second “shield tooth.” The scientists chose the name because the shape of the skull resembles that of a horse and its tooth crowns look much like oblong shields. The dinosaur also has a shelf of bone extending along the lower jaw parallel to its teeth, something not found in other iguanodonts. Paleontologists recovered nearly the entire skeleton, including the skull, vertebrae, and limbs, although many of the bones were crushed. It is estimated at 15 feet long, although scientists do not think the dinosaur was fully grown when it died, so adult hippodraco dinosaurs may have been larger. The dinosaur discovered in Utah is believed to be approximately 125 million years old.

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