KSA students celebrate Earth Science Week

We just love Earth Science Week, as do the students that come participate in our UGS activities. Here is a wonderful write up on Kearns-Saint Ann School Earth Science Week outing at the UGS a few weeks ago.

icatholic.org

The 1st-, 2nd- and 3rd-graders from Kearns-Saint Ann School recently took a field trip to the Utah Geological Survey Core Research Center to celebrate Earth Science Week.

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Microbialites from Great Salt Lake to be shown at Museum

Check out the Natural History Museum of Utah’s behind the scenes weekend in pictures. This gallery features an adventure to Great Salt Lake where researchers—including one of our geologists, Tom Chidsey and Michael Vanden Berg—pulled up microbialites for display at the museum.

VIEW GALLERY HERE

Striking lake oddity created by causeway to get makeover

Great Salt Lake’s North Arm is a little salty, even for Great Salt Lake. The Union Pacific railroad causeway is a factor in the build-up of salt crust in the north arm. The Railroad will be starting a bridge-building project to replace a part of the causeway, mitigating some of the water flow issues. Two of our geologists here at the UGS talk about the salt build up and how it’s affected the North Arm.

ksl.com

One of the strangest and most striking places in Utah — an enormous oddity that scientists say was created accidentally by human engineering — is getting a bit of a remodeling job.

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Reflecting on Earth Science Week 2015 at the Utah Geological Survey

The annual Earth Science Week celebration at the UGS this October was a success in large part due to a record number of volunteers.  Fifty-one outside volunteers, from institutions and organizations such as The University of Utah, Weber State University, Brigham Young University, Utah Valley University, Westminster College, NOAA, Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Rockhounders Outreach for Community Knowledge, Association for Women Geoscientists, Utah Geological Association, and Utah Friends of Paleontology, joined the UGS to educate Utah’s youth through hands-on Earth science activities. We deeply appreciate the volunteer’s contributions! More than 700 elementary school students participated in this year’s Earth Science Week.

Rick Allis Earth Science Week Mineral Testing

Utah Geological Survey Director, Rick Allis, teaches students about Mineral Testing.

Utah Geological Survey 2016 calendar features rarely seen vistas

Another feature on our recently released 2016 Calendar of Utah Geology. If you haven’t looked yet, check it out!

suindependent.com

The Utah Geological Survey, which provides timely scientific information about Utah’s geologic environment, resources, and hazards, released its 2016 calendar of Utah geology. The Utah Geological Survey 2016 calendar features some of Utah’s most rarely seen vistas as photographed by UGS staff as they travel the state researching and studying these geologic wonders.

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Don Mabey

A sad passing in the Geology community— Don Mabey was the Utah Geological Survey Deputy Director from 1982–1986.

Read his obituary HERE.

Utah Department of Natural Resources unveils new building Read more: Iron County Today – Utah Department of Natural Resources unveils new building

ironcountytoday.com

On Sept. 28, the Utah Department of Natural Resources celebrated the opening of its new Southwest Regional Complex in Cedar City.

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Seismologists See Salt Lake City Future Disaster by Reading the Dirt

If you missed it a couple of weeks ago, here is an article outlining the paleoseismic study some of our UGS geologists helped with on a trench.

nextcity.org

Not far from I-215 in Salt Lake City, near the airport, a deep trench cuts through the earth. Though it looks like a sewer repair project, there’s nothing down here but dirt. And dirt, to the trained eye, can reveal quite a bit about a city’s future.

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UGS geologists conducting a trench investigation to gather fault and earthquake data.

Geologists sample Taylorsville-West Valley fault line to study earthquake risk

Take a quick minute today on your afternoon break to think about earthquake preparedness. What have you done around your home to help relieve potential damage from a large earthquake? Have you talked to your family and friends, do you have an action plan if an earthquake occurs?

A team of geologists, including some of our very own Utah Geological Survey geologists, have been studying the Taylorsville-West Valley City fault over the last couple of weeks. They hope to gain a better understanding of the fault’s ability to produce large earthquakes, and if that fault tends to rupture with or without the Wasatch Fault. Below are a couple of articles outlining all of their hard work and findings!

deseretnews.com

Geologists sample Taylorsville-West Valley fault line to study earthquake risk

A team of geologists has dug a 150-foot trench by the Salt Lake City International Airport to study the Taylorsville-West Valley City fault, and its rock samples will help scientists forecast when the next major earthquake could erupt along the Wasatch fault.

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ksl.com

Utahns ‘lulled into a false sense of security’ in earthquake prep

A team of geologists has dug a 150-foot trench by the Salt Lake City International Airport to study the Taylorsville-West Valley City fault, and its rock samples will help scientists forecast when the next major earthquake could erupt along the Wasatch fault.

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UGS geologists conducting a trench investigation to gather fault and earthquake data.

Researchers studying Taylorsville-West Valley City Fault to better understand quake conditions in Utah

We hope you all had an enjoyable and safe long Labor Day weekend! Here’s a little story for the Tuesday morning catchup. A research team, including some of our UGS geologists, are studying a portion of the Taylorsville-West Valley City Fault to gain a better sense of past earthquakes on the fault. Read more!

fox13now.com

A research team is digging up a portion of the Taylorsville-West Valley City Fault out by the Salt Lake City International Airport, and their goal is to get a better sense of the danger from that fault and how big of an earthquake it could create.

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