Interact with Paleontologists at Cleveland Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry This Week

ecprogress.com

The Bureau of Land Management Price Field Office is offering a special opportunity for young scientists and their families to interact with professional paleontologists at work in the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry.

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What Killed the Dinosaurs in Utah’s Giant Jurassic Death Pit?

smithsonianmag.com

Utah is dinosaur country—so much so that the state has a scenic byway system called the Dinosaur Diamond that connects ancient final resting places across the desert. But among the sites holding preserved tracks and dusty fossils, one boneyard stands out as a 148-million-year-old mystery: the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry.

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Here’s What Happened the Day the Dinosaurs Died

news.nationalgeographic.com

Imagine sunrise on the last day of the Mesozoic era, 66 million years ago. Shafts of sunlight rake through the swamps and coniferous forests along the coast of what is now Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula. The blood-warm seas of the Gulf of Mexico teem with life.

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The Dinosaur Fossil Bubble Has Popped and Natural History Museums Are Pumped

inverse.com

Late last month, a nearly complete mounted Stegosaurus skeleton was put up for auction in Germany. The piece was a showstopper, valued at $2.7 million and described as the most complete skeleton of its species ever assembled. And even then, there was more, because the fossils showed battle wounds proving the beast had used its tail to successfully defend itself against a predator. Not only was this a Stegosaurus, it was a battle-hardened one.

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How the Brain Limited the Size of Dinosaurs

huffingtonpost.com

Long-necked Sauropods, like Brontosaurus, were the largest animals on earth, but their brain, not their leg strength, is what kept them from getting any bigger.

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Track Makers in Southern Utah: The St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site

blogs.plos.org

When it comes to absolutely amazing paleontological resources, Utah arguably reigns supreme within the United States (I may be a bit biased). And with the upcoming Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting taking place in Salt Lake City, paleontologists and paleo enthusiasts will be flocking to the Beehive State to discuss and share the latest breakthroughs in the field. To those coming to the meeting this October, one thing I cannot stress enough: do not miss what Utah has to offer in terms of spectacular fossil sites and museums. It will be difficult to avoid, as the SVP host committee this year is offering up eleven (eleven!!!) field trips to different parts of the state to see everything from the Triassic-Jurassic transition to Mesozoic dinosaurs to Eocene fishes to Pleistocene shorelines, and more.

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Two New Discoveries Add to a Horned Dino Revolution

smithsonianmag.com

Everyone knows Triceratops. Old “three-horned face” has stood as the ultimate in spiky dinosaurs since it was named in 1889. Yet Triceratops was only the last in a long line of horned dinosaurs. Horned dinosaurs thrived on prehistoric Asia and North America for over 100 million years, and it’s only now that paleontologists are uncovering a wealth of ceratopsians that are weirder and more varied than anyone ever expected.

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Paleo Profile: Mexico’s Mystery Dinosaur

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com

A few years back, while crashing at my apartment for the night during a long trip west, a friend of mine asked me “Haven’t paleontologists found all the dinosaurs already?” Museums from coast-to-coast seem well-stocked with primordial reptiles, and, really, when dealing with such giants, how many species could there possibly be? I had to chuckle at my friend’s question. Not only were there more dinosaur species than we ever imagined, but we’re still a long way from finding them all.

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Funding sought for T. rex excavation

sunews.net

Tyrannosaurus rex! Few names inspire as much awe and fear as T. rex, the undisputed king of the Late Cretaceous time period in North America. Even though this beast’s name is a household word, T. rex and its cousins (collectively known as tyrannosaurs) are actually quite rare. This is even truer for those members of the family that lived in the southern U.S. and Mexico. For that region, the number of identifiable skulls can be counted on one hand.

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