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Geologic Map of the Yellowjacket Canyon Quadrangle, Kane County, Utah, and Mohave County, Arizona

By: Janice M. Hayden

The Yellowjacket Canyon 7.5′ quadrangle is divided north-south by the Sevier fault zone with the lower Navajo Sandstone and older rocks creating the Vermilion Cliffs step of the Grand Staircase on the up-thrown block to the east, and the upper Navajo Sandstone and younger rocks creating the White Cliffs step of the Grand Staircase on the down-dropped block to the west. Exposed strata range from the Triassic Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation to the Jurassic Co-op Creek Limestone Member of the Carmel Formation. Eoloian sand dunes, including those of Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park, stretch northeast to southwest across the map area.

This CD contains geographic information system (GIS) files in ESRI file geodatabase and shapefile formats. Also included are two plates-the geologic map at 1:24,000 and the explanation sheet-both in PDF format. The latest version of Adobe Reader is required to view the PDF files. Specialized GIS software is required to use the GIS files.

M-256DM……….. $24.95

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POTD September 12, 2013: Orderville, Kane County, Utah

Orderville, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Lance Weaver

Utah showcases a multitude of canyons as varied as its high mountains and dry deserts. Ranging from V- and U-shaped valleys at the edge of mountains to deep and narrow slot canyons in the south, the shapes result from types of erosion and factors such as precipitation amount and rock type. Erosion can be from powerful rivers and glaciers, forceful flash floods, or winds adding a sculpting touch.

Southern Utah has a lot of bare rock with little vegetation, so rainwater runoff typically ends up flowing into narrow canyons and producing flash floods with great erosive power. The resulting slot canyons are dry most of the time, such as this one near Orderville, Kane County.

New Publications M-261DM and OFR-605

Geologic map of the Johnson Lakes quadrangle, Kane County, Utah, and Coconino County, Arizona,

By: Janice M. Hayden

The Johnson Lakes quadrangle includes parts of the Chocolate (Shinarump) and Vermilion Cliff steps of the Grand Staircase in the southwest part of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. Reddish-brown Lower Jurassic strata of the Vermilion Cliffs dominate the map area. Overall, strata dip gently to the northwest. They are cut by the Paunsaugunt fault at the east edge of the map area, and by several minor, mostly down-to-the-west normal faults. A variety of surficial deposits locally conceal bedrock, including broad alluvial and eolian surfaces deeply incised by modern arroyos. “Picture stone” from the Shinarump Conglomerate Member of the Chinle Formation is quarried locally.

This CD contains geographic information system (GIS) files in ESRI file geodatabase and shapefile formats. Also included are two plates-the geologic map at 1:24,000 and the explanation sheet-both in PDF format. The latest version of Adobe Reader is required to view the PDF files. Specialized GIS software is required to use the GIS files.


M-261DM……………………………….$24.95

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Hydrogeochemistry, geothermometry, and structural setting of Thermal Springs in northern Utah and southeastern Idaho,

By:Brennan Young, Katherine, Shervais, Moises Ponce-Zepeda, Sari Rosove, James Evans

This CD contains a 29-page report conducted by undergraduate researchers at Utah State University during 2010 and 2011 under the direction of Dr. James P. Evans. It includes data collected from hot springs in northern Utah and southeastern Idaho, including location, temperature, acidity, salinity, cation concentrations, and maximum reservoir temperature estimates acquired through the application of several cation geothermometers.


OFR-605…………………………………..$14.95

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POTD August 22, 2013: Bluffs above Wahweap Bay on Lake Powell, Kane County, Utah

Bluffs of Entrada Sandstone above Wahweap Bay on Lake Powell, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Lance Weaver

One of the most photographed geologic formations in Utah if not the world, the Entrada Sandstone is the featured rock unit of Arches National Park, Goblin Valley State Park, Kodachrome Basin State Park, and parts of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Variations in the Entrada’s appearance across the state are due to differences in internal structure and composition as well as external stresses.

POTD August 21, 2013: Kodachrome Basin State Park, Kane County, Utah

Kodachrome Basin State Park, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Carole McCalla

Sand pipe of Carmel Formation sediment intruded into the overlying Entrada Sandstone. One of the most photographed geologic formations in Utah if not the world, the Entrada Sandstone is the featured rock unit of Arches National Park, Goblin Valley State Park, Kodachrome Basin State Park, and parts of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Variations in the Entrada’s appearance across the state are due to differences in internal structure and composition as well as external stresses.

Special POTD submission! August 2, 2013: Cascade Falls Trail

Special thanks to Burke McClure for the submission!

Remember, you can always submit your photos of Utah! Send your pictures to ugssmedia@gmail.com, find us on Facebook, or Tweet us! We love hearing from you.

POTD July 24, 2013: Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Kane County, Utah

Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Tyler Knudsen

The narrow defile of Round Valley Draw exposes layers of ancient petrified dunes of the Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone. This is one of numerous slot canyons in Utah’s canyon country formed by the scouring action of infrequent but powerful flood waters.

POTD July 16, 2013: Dixie National Forest, Kane County, Utah

Dixie National Forest, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Tyler Knudsen

Golden aspen, blue sky, and dark basaltic lava provide dramatic contrast along the Navajo Lake Loop Trail on the Markagunt Plateau. The geologically young Quaternaryage lava erupted from a nearby cinder cone and flowed across Duck Creek, creating a natural dam that formed Navajo Lake.

POTD July 5, 2013: Cookie Jar Butte, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Kane County, Utah

Cookie Jar Butte,Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Kane County.
Photographer: Jim Davis

Cookie Jar Butte, named for the gigantic, cylindrical weathering pits that dot its peninsula, towers above Padre Bay on Lake Powell.

Keeping Zion National Park Visitors Safe from Geologic Hazards

A new geologic-hazards investigation, published by the Utah Geological Survey, could help Zion National Park (ZNP) keep its 2.5 million annual visitors safe. The results of the investigation will provide the National Park Service (NPS) with geologic-hazard information for future park management.

Zion National Park is subject to a variety of geologic hazards that may affect park development and visitor safety. “One of the nation’s scenic jewels, Zion National Park, is also home to a variety of geologic hazards. By supporting this study of geologic hazards in high-use areas of the park, the National Park Service has taken a proactive approach to protecting visitor safety,” says William Lund, UGS Senior Geologist.

The ZNP geologic-hazards study area is a 154-square-mile area that encompasses Zion Canyon, Kolob Canyon, Kolob Terrace, the Zion-Mount Carmel Highway corridor, and all developed and high-use areas of the park. This investigation includes nine 1:24,000-scale geographic information system (GIS)-based maps that show areas subject to flooding, debris flows, rock fall, landslides, surface faulting, liquefaction, collapsible and expansive rocks and soils, and/or soil piping and erosion.

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