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Think dinosaurs roared like in ‘Jurassic Park’? The truth, new research says, is a bit wimpier

sltrib.com

Picture, if you will, the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex.

The odds are good what you envision has been brought to you in part by “Jurassic Park,” a plastic toy or some other facet of pop culture.

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Sunset on Gooseberry Mesa shines golden light on cliffs of Triassic-age Shinarump Conglomerate and the underlying slope-forming Moenkopi Formation. White cliffs and peaks in the distance are thrones and temples of Zion National Park, formed of Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone. Gooseberry Mesa, Washington County, Utah Photographer: J. Lucy Jordan; © 2016

POTD June 10, 2016: Gooseberry Mesa, Washington County, Utah

POTD 5-31-16 Washington County

Gooseberry Mesa, Washington County, Utah
Photographer: J. Lucy Jordan; © 2016

Sunset on Gooseberry Mesa shines golden light on cliffs of Triassic-age Shinarump Conglomerate and the underlying slope-forming Moenkopi Formation. White cliffs and peaks in the distance are thrones and temples of Zion National Park, formed of Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone.

Delicate Arch, a 65-foot-tall natural arch in Arches National Park, Grand County, is composed of Jurassic-age sandstone including the Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone (base and pedestals) and Moab Member of the Curtis Formation (bridge). Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah Photographer: Marshall Robinson; © 2015

POTD March 23, 2016: Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

POTD 3-22-16 Delicate Arch

Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Marshall Robinson; © 2015

Delicate Arch, a 65-foot-tall natural arch in Arches National Park, Grand County, is composed of Jurassic-age sandstone including the Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone (base and pedestals) and Moab Member of the Curtis Formation (bridge).

Towering 1,488 feet above the canyon floor, Angels Landing is a joint-controlled resistant fin of Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone, carved out by the incised North Fork Virgin River. A popular, but steep and exposed, hiking trail guides park visitors along the sheer fin to inspiring views of Zion Canyon. Zion National Park, Washington County, Utah Photographer: Adam McKean; © 2015

POTD March 15, 2016: Zion National Park, Washington County, Utah

POTD 3-15-16 Angels Landing Zion National Park

Zion National Park, Washington County, Utah
Photographer: Adam McKean; © 2015

Towering 1,488 feet above the canyon floor, Angels Landing is a joint-controlled resistant fin of Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone, carved out by the incised North Fork Virgin River. A popular, but steep and exposed, hiking trail guides park visitors along the sheer fin to inspiring views of Zion Canyon.

Fluted crimson walls of Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone rim Cathedral Valley in the remote northern part of Capitol Reef National Park. The near-vertical Entrada walls owe their existence to the overlying white Curtis Formation that serves as a protective cap rock. Capitol Reef National Park, Wayne County, Utah Photographer: Tyler Knudsen; © 2015

POTD March 8, 2016: Capitol Reef National Park, Wayne County, Utah

Wishing our Tuesday was spent out there! The weather just gets nicer and nicer by the day. What Utah places do you want to explore this year?

POTD 3-8-16 Capitol Reef National Park, WAyne County

Capitol Reef National Park, Wayne County, Utah
Photographer: Tyler Knudsen; © 2015

Fluted crimson walls of Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone rim Cathedral Valley in the remote northern part of Capitol Reef National Park. The near-vertical Entrada walls owe their existence to the overlying white Curtis Formation that serves as a protective cap rock.

Light-brown sandstone of the Jurassic-age Curtis Formation caps the underlying reddish siltstone of the Entrada Formation in Cathedral Valley. In places, only boulders remain of the resistant cap rock as the Curtis Formation slowly weathers away. Cathedral Valley Overlook, Capitol Reef National Park, Wayne County, Utah Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2015

POTD February 12, 2016: Cathedral Valley Overlook, Capitol Reef National Park, Wayne County, Utah

POTD 2-9-16 Capitol Reef National Park

Cathedral Valley Overlook, Capitol Reef National Park, Wayne County, Utah
Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2015

Light-brown sandstone of the Jurassic-age Curtis Formation caps the underlying reddish siltstone of the Entrada Formation in Cathedral Valley. In places, only boulders remain of the resistant cap rock as the Curtis Formation slowly weathers away.

The setting sun illuminates the Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone cliffs of Cougar Mountain (right) and South Guardian Angel (left) as viewed from Kolob Reservoir Road. Here, the road travels on top of the 220,000- to 310,000-year-old Grapevine Wash lava flow (dark rocks in middle ground). Zion National Park, Washington County, Utah Photographer: Adam McKean; © 2015

POTD November 3, 2015: Zion National Park, Washington County, Utah

POTD 11-3-15 Zion National Park

Zion National Park, Washington County, Utah
Photographer: Adam McKean; © 2015

The setting sun illuminates the Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone cliffs of Cougar Mountain (right) and South Guardian Angel (left) as viewed from Kolob Reservoir Road. Here, the road travels on top of the 220,000- to 310,000-year-old Grapevine Wash lava flow (dark rocks in middle ground).

Snow highlights cross-bedding on the sides of buttes and mesas along the Clear Creek drainage on the east side of Zion National Park. Cross-beds in the nearly 2,000-foot-thick Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone formed in ancient sand dunes and reflect changing wind directions as the sand was being deposited. Zion National Park, Kane County, Utah Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2015

POTD October 6, 2015: Zion National Park, Kane County, Utah

The mornings are becoming a little crisper, and night comes a little quicker. It won’t belong before we see this scene!

POTD 10-6-15 Zion National Park, Kane County

Zion National Park, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Adam Hiscock; © 2015

Snow highlights cross-bedding on the sides of buttes and mesas along the Clear Creek drainage on the east side of Zion National Park. Cross-beds in the nearly 2,000-foot-thick Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone formed in ancient sand dunes and reflect changing wind directions as the sand was being deposited.

The Colorado River loops around the Gooseneck between Dead Horse Point State Park and distant cliffs of the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park. The river has carved and exposed nearly flat-lying Jurassic to Pennsylvanian-age sedimentary strata of the Colorado Plateau. Dead Horse Point State Park, San Juan County, Utah Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

POTD May 19, 2015: Dead Horse Point State Park, San Juan County, Utah

While this photo is a throwback to colder seasons, we cannot deny the stunning #UtahGeology present. This crisp, cold picture is worth a thousand hand warmers—that’s how the saying goes, right?

POTD 5-12-15 Dead Horse Point San juan

Dead Horse Point State Park, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

The Colorado River loops around the Gooseneck between Dead Horse Point State Park and distant cliffs of the Island in the Sky District of Canyonlands National Park. The river has carved and exposed nearly flat-lying Jurassic to Pennsylvanian-age sedimentary strata of the Colorado Plateau.

Turret Arch viewed through North Window arch in The Windows Section of Arches National Park. The arches formed as the result of erosion through weak parts of sandstone fins composed of Jurassic-age Dewey Bridge Member of the Carmel Formation and Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone. Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

POTD January 20, 2015: Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

POTD 1-20-15 Arches National Park, Grand County, Turret Arch

Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

Turret Arch viewed through North Window arch in The Windows Section of Arches National Park. The arches formed as the result of erosion through weak parts of sandstone fins composed of Jurassic-age Dewey Bridge Member of the Carmel Formation and Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone.