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POTD June 27, 2017: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area
Photographer: Grant Willis © 2017
Padres Butte towers over Lake Powell’s Padre Bay, both named for the Dominguez-Escalante Expedition, which crossed the Colorado River near this site in 1776. Padres and the other buttes in this area are composed of Entrada Sandstone, one of several geologic formations that form the sandstone “slickrock” that typifies much of southern Utah’s landscape.

POTD February 10, 2014: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, San Juan County, Utah

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, San Juan County, Utah
Photographer: Don DeBlieux; © 2011

Dinosaur tracks on a block of fallen Jurassic-age Navajo Sandstone. North of the confluence of the San Juan and Colorado Rivers, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, San Juan County.

POTD February 5, 2014: Hite Crossing vicinity, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Garfield and San Juan Counties, Utah

Hite Crossing vicinity, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Garfield and San Juan Counties, Utah
Photographer: Don DeBlieux; ©2011

Permian- and Triassic-age sedimentary rocks color the shorelines of dam-impounded Lake Powell near the confluence of the Colorado and Dirty Devil Rivers. Although the lake water has submerged numerous relicts of ancient animal (including human) and plant life, traces of prehistoric life can still be found along the lake shores and in some tributaries.

POTD January 14, 2014: Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Kane County, Utah

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Tyler Knudsen

Eroded through the Navajo Sandstone, Coyote Natural Bridge is in Coyote Gulch, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Kane County

POTD August 22, 2013: Bluffs above Wahweap Bay on Lake Powell, Kane County, Utah

Bluffs of Entrada Sandstone above Wahweap Bay on Lake Powell, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Lance Weaver

One of the most photographed geologic formations in Utah if not the world, the Entrada Sandstone is the featured rock unit of Arches National Park, Goblin Valley State Park, Kodachrome Basin State Park, and parts of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Variations in the Entrada’s appearance across the state are due to differences in internal structure and composition as well as external stresses.

POTD August 21, 2013: Kodachrome Basin State Park, Kane County, Utah

Kodachrome Basin State Park, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Carole McCalla

Sand pipe of Carmel Formation sediment intruded into the overlying Entrada Sandstone. One of the most photographed geologic formations in Utah if not the world, the Entrada Sandstone is the featured rock unit of Arches National Park, Goblin Valley State Park, Kodachrome Basin State Park, and parts of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Variations in the Entrada’s appearance across the state are due to differences in internal structure and composition as well as external stresses.

MISCELLANEOUS PUBLICATION 09-2DM

MP-09-2DMGEOLOGIC MAP OF PART OF THE LEES FERRY AREA, GLEN CANYON NATIONAL RECREATION AREA, COCONINO COUNTY, ARIZONA
D.A. Phoenix

This CD contains a digital dataset of a geologic map of the Lees Ferry area, Arizona, and is one of several maps that together provide complete GIS geologic map coverage of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. The Utah Geological Survey Geologic Mapping Program produced the map from U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1137, scale 1:24,000, published in 1963.  Geographic Information System (GIS) files are provided as ESRI® file geodatabase and shapefiles. Metadata, PDF, text, and image files are included to help the user view, evaluate, and utilize the spatial data.  Adobe Reader® is required to view the PDF files and can be downloaded at www.adobe.com.  Specialized GIS software is required to utilize the GIS files.

CD (2 pl., 1:24,000 [contains GIS files]), ISBN 1-55791-809-0

MP-09-2DM……….$24.95

GET IT HERE