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POTD November 29, 2016: Devils Garden, Garfield County

Hoodoo consisting of Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone, Devils Garden, Garfield County.
Photographer: Marshall Robinson © 2016.

11-29-16

Reasons to hike Devil's Garden

ksl.com

There is no doubt that Delicate Arch is the most iconic image for Utah. Because of the dominance of that giant red inverted sandstone horseshoe, some visitors to Arches National Park miss the Devil’s Garden trail — a section of the park that offers much more scenic hiking and a plethora of unique arches.

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There is no doubt that Delicate Arch is the most iconic image for Utah. Because of the dominance of that giant red inverted sandstone horseshoe, some visitors to Arches National Park miss the Devil’s Garden trail — a section of the park that offers much more scenic hiking and a plethora of unique arches.
Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1288&sid=29857502#wExa3PDsi5FeD6Pe.99

POTD January 8, 2014: Devils Garden, Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Garfield County, Utah

Devils Garden, Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument, Garfield County, Utah
Photographer: Ken Krahulec

Metate Arch is sculpted by weathering and differential erosion of two sandstone layers along the contact of the Gunsight Butte and overlying Cannonville Members of the Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone. The arch is about 17 miles southeast of Escalante, just east of the Straight Cliffs.

GeoSight— Wall Arch, a Fallen Giant

geosights-wall-arch-beforeDuring the night of August 4, 2008, Utah lost a popular giant when Wall Arch, a prominent arch along the Devils Garden Trail in Arches National Park, collapsed.

While not the largest or most famous arch in the park, Wall Arch was still a favorite due to its proximity to Landscape Arch along the always-busy trail. With a measured span of 55 feet, it was ranked as 12th largest in the park (some publications and Web sites give the span as 71 feet – this is actually the “breadth”, a dimension that is not useful for comparing arches).

While no arch lasts forever, it is still extremely rare to see such a dramatic example of “geology in action.” We do not have a good geologic tool for dating arch formation, but we are sure that Wall Arch had stood nearly unchanged for hundreds, and probably thousands of years.

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