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Landsliding in Northern Utah, Early 2009

An upslope-facing scarp in the Springhill landslide in North Salt Lake. Additional damage to several of the houses on the landslide has resulted from an increase in the rate of movement in 2009

Local wet conditions in northern Utah have caused some landslides to reactivate along with other types of shallow slope failures. Areas with active landslides in early 2009 include Ogden Valley in eastern Weber County, western Morgan County, southeastern Davis County, and Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah County. Examples include:

1.  reactivation or acceleration of persistently moving historical landslides,
2.  minor movement of landslides in highway cut slopes,
3.  local highway embankment and rock-wall failures, and
4.  local shallow slides on steep slopes in pre-existing landslides.

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REPORTS OF INVESTIGATION 264

RI-264WETLANDS IN THE FARMINGTON BAY AREA, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH- AN EVALUATION OF THREATS POSED BY GROUND-WATER DEVELOPMENT AND DROUGHT
Charles E. Bishop, Mike Lowe, Janae Wallace, Richard L. Emerson, and J. Scott Horn

This CD contains a 36-page report of an evaluation by the Utah Geological Survey of threats to the Farmington Bay area wetlands posed by changes in climatic conditions and by increased ground-water withdrawals accompanying population growth. To evaluate the potential impacts of drought and increased development on the wetlands, we used existing data to estimate a water budget for the wetlands area. To determine the potential impacts posed by increased ground-water development and further drought, we used two regional, three-dimensional, steady-state and transient MODFLOW models for the east shore area of Great Salt Lake to evaluate water-budget changes for the wetland areas. The modeling suggests that subsurface inflow into the wetland areas would be most affected by decreased subsurface inflow due to long-term (20-year) drought conditions, but subsurface inflow would also decrease due to increased municipal and industrial well withdrawals over the same time period. Therefore, the worst-case scenario for the wetlands would be a combination of both conditions.

CD (36 p.)

RI-264………$14.95

GET IT HERE