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Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah Photographer: Sonja Heuscher; © 2014

POTD June 15, 2015: Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

We had to turn our air conditioning on this weekend—it’s getting hot! Cool down with this photo while we thaw out our spectacular Utah Geology.

POTD 6-2-15 Delicate Arch, Arches

Delicate Arch, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Sonja Heuscher; © 2014

The view through North Window arch in The Windows Section of Arches National Park reveals snow-covered sandstone spires and fins of the Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone. The spires and fins result from weathering and erosion along parallel fractures, or joints, in the rock. Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah Photographer: Sonja Heuscher; © 2014

POTD June 4, 2015: Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

POTD 5-26-15 Arhces National Park

Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Sonja Heuscher; © 2014

The view through North Window arch in The Windows Section of Arches National Park reveals snow-covered sandstone spires and fins of the Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone. The spires and fins result from weathering and erosion along parallel fractures, or joints, in the rock.

Photos: Utah’s National Parks

For those of our friends that can’t get out into the outdoor wonder-world this weekend, here are some stunning photos to keep you company.

travel.nationalgeographic.com

SEE THEM HERE

 

Turret Arch viewed through North Window arch in The Windows Section of Arches National Park. The arches formed as the result of erosion through weak parts of sandstone fins composed of Jurassic-age Dewey Bridge Member of the Carmel Formation and Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone. Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

POTD January 20, 2015: Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

POTD 1-20-15 Arches National Park, Grand County, Turret Arch

Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Gregg Beukelman; © 2014

Turret Arch viewed through North Window arch in The Windows Section of Arches National Park. The arches formed as the result of erosion through weak parts of sandstone fins composed of Jurassic-age Dewey Bridge Member of the Carmel Formation and Slick Rock Member of the Entrada Sandstone.

POTD July 22, 2014: Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Don DeBlieux; © 2013

Dissolution of subsurface salt caused the collapse of the Salt Valley anticline, forming vertical fractures in the Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone. Weathering along the fractures has produced the spectacular fins, towers, and arches in the Devils Garden section of Arches National Park.

Reasons to hike Devil's Garden

ksl.com

There is no doubt that Delicate Arch is the most iconic image for Utah. Because of the dominance of that giant red inverted sandstone horseshoe, some visitors to Arches National Park miss the Devil’s Garden trail — a section of the park that offers much more scenic hiking and a plethora of unique arches.

READ MORE

 

There is no doubt that Delicate Arch is the most iconic image for Utah. Because of the dominance of that giant red inverted sandstone horseshoe, some visitors to Arches National Park miss the Devil’s Garden trail — a section of the park that offers much more scenic hiking and a plethora of unique arches.
Read more at http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1288&sid=29857502#wExa3PDsi5FeD6Pe.99

POTD April 23, 2014: The Windows Section, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

The Windows Section, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Adam McKean; © 2012

The Windows Section, Arches National Park, Grand County.

POTD December 13, 2013: The Windows Section, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

The Windows Section, Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Nicholas Daniels

North Window Arch frames the distant landscape through a fin of the Jurassic-age Entrada Sandstone. The Windows Section, Arches National Park, Grand County.

POTD August 23, 2013: Poison Strip area, east of Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah

Poison Strip area, east of Arches National Park, Grand County, Utah
Photographer: Don DeBlieux

A geologist examines a sequence of Early Cretaceous-aged paleosols (ancient soils) in the Yellow Cat Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation. Many dinosaur fossils are found in these rocks, and the study of paleosols can provide valuable
information about the environments in which these dinosaurs lived.

POTD August 22, 2013: Bluffs above Wahweap Bay on Lake Powell, Kane County, Utah

Bluffs of Entrada Sandstone above Wahweap Bay on Lake Powell, Kane County, Utah
Photographer: Lance Weaver

One of the most photographed geologic formations in Utah if not the world, the Entrada Sandstone is the featured rock unit of Arches National Park, Goblin Valley State Park, Kodachrome Basin State Park, and parts of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Variations in the Entrada’s appearance across the state are due to differences in internal structure and composition as well as external stresses.