Lower Bells Canyon Reservoir and glacially sculpted Bells Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County. Bells Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County, Utah Photographer: Jim Davis; © 2015

POTD May 2, 2016: Bells Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County, Utah

POTD 4-26-16 Bells Canyon Salt Lake County

Bells Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County, Utah
Photographer: Jim Davis; © 2015

Lower Bells Canyon Reservoir and glacially sculpted Bells Canyon, Wasatch Range, Salt Lake County.

Arches National Park seeks public’s help finding rock graffiti vandals

ksl.com

Arches National Park is seeking the public’s help in finding who is responsible for vandalizing one of the park’s rocks with graffiti.

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Paleo Profile: Mexico’s Mystery Dinosaur

phenomena.nationalgeographic.com

A few years back, while crashing at my apartment for the night during a long trip west, a friend of mine asked me “Haven’t paleontologists found all the dinosaurs already?” Museums from coast-to-coast seem well-stocked with primordial reptiles, and, really, when dealing with such giants, how many species could there possibly be? I had to chuckle at my friend’s question. Not only were there more dinosaur species than we ever imagined, but we’re still a long way from finding them all.

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Utah, Arizona and Nevada meet in earthquake country

sltrib.com

Signs of earthquakes are everywhere in the chaotically beautiful geology of southwest Utah and the region where the mile-high Colorado Plateau falls off into the corrugated Basin-and-Range landscape that dominates neighboring Nevada.

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Funding sought for T. rex excavation

sunews.net

Tyrannosaurus rex! Few names inspire as much awe and fear as T. rex, the undisputed king of the Late Cretaceous time period in North America. Even though this beast’s name is a household word, T. rex and its cousins (collectively known as tyrannosaurs) are actually quite rare. This is even truer for those members of the family that lived in the southern U.S. and Mexico. For that region, the number of identifiable skulls can be counted on one hand.

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Study: Europe witnessed dinosaur exodus

More than a Bank Holiday—Evidence of a large scale dinosaur migration out of Europe.

wcvb.com

More than 100 million years ago, something curious happened.

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New Droopy Dinosaur Hung Its Head Like an Enormous Eeyore

Heading in the right direction—scientists unearth a titanosaur skull that’s lending a lot of insight on these large dinosaurs.

news.nationalgeographic.com

The largest dinosaurs of all time had a bad habit of losing their heads. When a titanosaur died, its small skull often wound up far from its massive body, making it hard for paleontologists to track down an animal’s noggin millions of years later.

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Fossil find: New Pterosaur found near Dinosaur National Monument

Pterrorizing Vernal, Utah like it’s 210 million years ago.

steamboattoday.com

There’s more reason to make the voyage toward Vernal, Utah — and to be glad you weren’t doing so 210 million years ago.

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Earthquake country laid bare

thespectrum.com

Signs of earthquakes are everywhere in the chaotically beautiful geology of southwest Utah and the region where the mile-high Colorado Plateau falls off into the corrugated Basin-and-Range landscape that dominates neighboring Nevada.

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North American Mammoths May Have Been a Single Species

smithsonianmag.com

From the tundra of Alaska to the plains of central Mexico, from islands off California to the Atlantic coastline, mammoths trumpeted and bellowed across North America. Paleontologists traditionally have divided all these Ice Age pachyderms into at least three species—and perhaps as many as four or five. This division was based on differences in teeth and bone. But these aren’t the only clues; mammoths also left remnants of their genes, and this DNA tells a different story. Where there were once multiple mammoths, there may have only been one.

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